Fourth of July, 1913 – It’s All About the Vote

1913wagon-2

Imagine you are there, 100 years ago today … The campaign to win a woman suffrage referendum in the Empire State was kicked off three days ago in Revolutionary style. A wagon, built in 1776 by Ebenezer Conklin and appropriately named the “Spirit of 1776,” left the Manhattan headquarters of the New York State Woman […]

The Suffragists’ Protest on Independence Day, 1876: You Are There

Anthony and Stanton

July 4, 1876: An eloquent and timely reminder that the American Revolution has brought liberty and equality to only some of its citizens over the past century became an unauthorized part of the nation’s centennial celebration here at Independence Square in Philadelphia today. Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Sara Andrews Spencer, Lillie Devereux Blake and Phoebe W. Couzins […]

Black Herstory: From Suffrage to Civil Rights

Daisy Lampkin

Though many of those who worked for woman suffrage were content to end their careers as activists when the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, Daisy Lampkin just shifted gears and never slowed down. That’s because she saw “Votes for Women” as just one step toward achieving political, economic and social justice for all in […]

Live-Blogging Women’s History: March 31, 1915

Alice_Paul_1915

Today marks the end of Women’s History Month, and the completion of 31 days of David Dismore’s you-are-there reports (check through Mscellany to catch the ones you’ve missed). He ends with a post on his favorite topic, woman suffrage. March 31, 1915: Today, Alice Paul‘s Congressional Union (CU) became a national organization, adopted a constitution […]

Live-Blogging Women’s History: March 30, 1970

New York capitol

March 30, 1970: The New York State Assembly today came within three votes of replacing the state’s 140-year-old ban on abortions–except those to save the life of the woman–with a bill that would make abortions a matter strictly between a woman and her doctor (through the 24th week of pregnancy). After the State Senate passed […]

Live-Blogging Women’s History: March 29, 1875

virginia_louisa_minor

March 29, 1875: The Supreme Court affirmed today that American women are citizens–but ruled that citizenship does not entail the right to vote. Had it been decided differently, the Minor v. Happersett ruling could have spelled victory in the 27-year struggle for woman suffrage. The 14th Amendment, passed in 1868 to ban states from abridging […]

Live-Blogging Women’s History: March 28, 1931

Anna Kelton Wiley

March 28, 1931: The effort by the National Woman’s Party to fight increased discrimination against women in the workforce as the Depression deepens has gotten some help from a few of the nation’s governors. Today’s development came in response to a recent salvo in the war on women workers: It was fired by the Cotton-Textile […]

Live-Blogging Women’s History: March 27, 1922

Ruth_Hale_1921

March 27, 1922: In a show of solidarity not seen since winning nationwide suffrage a year and a half ago, local women are protesting tonight’s enforcement of a New York City law that bans them–but not men–from smoking in public places. Mary Garrett Hay, a non-smoker and head of the New York City League of […]

Live-Blogging Women’s History: March 26, 1878

Regina Benjamin

March 26, 1878: A large audience was in attendance tonight in New York’s Union League lecture room for a meeting called by the Association for the Advancement of the Medical Education of Women. This new organization would like to increase the quality of education women physicians in the U.S. receive. As of the last census […]

Live-Blogging Women’s History: March 25, 1942

Jacqueline "Jackie" Cochran

March 25, 1942: It was officially confirmed today that 25 of America’s best women pilots are going to Britain to help with the Allied war effort. After learning that the American Army Air Corps and Ferry Command had no immediate plans to use women, Jacqueline Cochran began recruiting women pilots about six weeks ago for […]