Fabulous Feminist Fiction for the End of Summer

Summer days spent with a good book are coming to an end—which gives feminists all the more reason to rush out and read these before fall comes.

Five Feminist Poems for National Poetry Month: “Songs for the People” by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

Born in 1825 to free African American parents, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper was a prolific journalist and poet as well as an abolitionist and suffragist. In “Songs for the People,” she imagines poetry filling “the world with peace.”

Five Feminist Poems for National Poetry Month: “The Letter” by Amy Lowell

“The Letter” is playful and fanciful, celebrating the beloved through letter writing—although in the final stanza, Amy Lowell reveals the complexity of her emotions.

Five Feminist Poems for National Poetry Month: “The Quiet Woman” by Genevieve Taggard

Women have been responding to sexual harassment for generations. Poet Genevieve Taggard, born in 1894 in Washington state, was one of them; in “The Quiet Woman,” she captures fury and anger “like a surly tiger” of a woman fending off an unwanted advance.

Five Feminist Poems for National Poetry Month: “The Washerwoman” by Mary Weston Fordham

Mary Western Fordham portrays the body and the mind of a working woman in “The Washerwoman.”

Five Feminist Poems for National Poetry Month: “To Sylvia” by Amy Levy

“To Sylvia” is from Amy Levy’s 1884 collection A Minor Poet and Other Verse. Reaching across the centuries to read the poem is an encounter with passion and desire.

On Editing Sister Love

I heard tell of the correspondence between Pat Parker and Audre Lorde before I sat down to have brunch with Martha Dunham.

Talkin’ About a Revolution: JP Howard on Raising Her Fist—and Queer Women’s Voices

“It is crucial, in fact necessary, to have literary spaces like Sinister Wisdom to raise our voices, lift our symbolic fists and say ‘We are here! We are not going anywhere. We refuse to be silenced.'”

Unearthing Histories of Love, Exile and Perseverance

Philosophically provocative, historically rich and interesting, The Weight of Ink is the perfect summer novel—balancing richly drawn characters with a driving, compelling plot.

Five Feminist Poems for National Poetry Month: 5. “MO[DERN] [FRAME]”

Visual art is often an inspiration for poetry; poems based on visual art are called ‘ekphrastic poems.’ In “MO[DERN] [FRAME]” by Dawn Lundy Martin, Martin writes responses to an image by Carrie Mae Weems, an American artist who, over the past 25 years, has created “a complex body of art that has at various times […]

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