46 Plays By Women You SHOULD Be Seeing

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In 2013, 13 women hailing from Los Angeles banded together to form The Kilroys, who coyly announce, “We make trouble. And plays.” Named after the graffiti soldiers used to declare their presence during World War II, The Kilroys are playwrights and producers looking to end the underrepresentation of female-identified voices in the American theater scene. […]

Call Robin Thicke’s #GetHerBack Campaign What It Is: Stalking

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“The most controversial song of the decade.” That was the name given by UK’s The Guardian to Robin Thicke’s “rapey” single “Blurred Lines.” But that’s old news. What has people talking now is his twisted new single, “Get Her Back.” Yes, despite dozens of schools banning his music, countless bloggers condemning his last hit and […]

Ruining the “Fun”: Patricia Lockwood’s Slippery Poetry

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In a dark coincidence, the author of the widely-shared poem “Rape Joke,” Patricia Lockwood, released her second book of poetry just four days after the Isla Vista killings. Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals deals with the objectification of and violence against women in a mystical, gritty and surprisingly elegant way, and though the timing was certainly not intentional, […]

A Quintuple F for Obvious Child (And That’s Good, Not Bad)

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The new film Obvious Child is informed by F-words of all sorts. It’s funny and feminist. It’s about friendship and forgiveness. It contains jokes about flatulence. It’s radically important for so many reasons, not least among them that “seeing an abortion in a negative light in a movie makes viewers less likely to support abortion […]

Want to Read More Writing by Women? Shebooks Wants to Publish Them

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In 2012, I took the plunge and wrote a book about the battle to end abortion and birth control access one red state at a time. It was a heart-wrenching, brain-numbing, hair-pulling, high-anxiety commitment. It was also one of the most fulfilling things I have ever done, and one I can’t wait to pursue again. […]

Dragon 2: DreamWorks Could Use Some Training in Racial Stereotyping

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Diversity in animation is often evident via the fanciful creatures that populate such stories. Big green ogres, cutesy blue smurfs, jocular bright-yellow minions. In How to Train Your Dragon 2 dragons are the diverse creatures of choice, ranging from the uber-spikey untrainable babies, to the salamander-like faithful Toothless, to the menacing mastadonesque alpha-dragon. The humans that […]

Lana Del Rey: Not a Feminist

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Count Lana Del Rey as the latest celebrity claiming to not be a feminist. She joins the ranks of Shailene Woodley, Lady Gaga and Taylor Swift, all who have recently rejected the feminist label because they “love men,” or “don’t think of things as guys versus girls.” What such celebrities are lacking is an accurate […]

Awkwafina, Fierce and Funny (and Asian-American), Takes on Hip-Hop

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One might say the illest new rapper on the block is a water brand. Or, rather, the name of a water brand re-envisioned as an Asian-American rapper, Awkwafina, who introduced the superpower of the queef in her album Yellow Ranger, released in February. More recently, Nora Lum—the New York-based artist behind Awkwafina—has been working on […]

The Fault in Our Stars: Our Love Affair with Romance and Feminism

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Pain demands to be felt. So goes one of the wise lines from John Green’s bestselling novel The Fault in Our Stars. The line is prominently featured in the movie of the same title—and rightfully so, given that this dictum on the necessity of feeling pain is a key reason the story is so compelling. […]

The Political Romance of Belle

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Before making the film Belle, screenwriter Misan Sagay  first saw the painting—an 18th-century portrait of Lady Elizabeth Murray with Dido Elizabeth Belle alongside her—and noticed a striking difference from other paintings of the era depicting black subjects. In this painting, the woman of color, Belle, is positioned somewhat as an equal, not bowed or stooping […]