Twentieth Century Foxes Twelve centenarians reflect on women' progress an offer advice.
Time Capsule Capturing the century through the objects that changed women's lives
Women on The Verge of 2000

Ms.CELLANEOUS
-Just the Facts
-Word: (My) Lord
-Weightlifter
-Have You Seen This Potato?

What About Tomorrow?>by Marcia Ann Gillespie
YOUR WORK:
-Go Figure: Wag Gap Wrangling
-Why the Consulting Business Is Becoming Woman Friendly
-Women Architects: If You Build It
-Worknotes
Who Knew? A compendium of women's deeds, feats, and innovations
ARTS:
-Great Leaps Forward -Artswatch
Being There A look back at the events that shaped and changed America during the twentieth century
BOOKS:
-Novel Companions: Writers on Books They Treasure

- Editor's Page
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- Making Waves
- No Comment

NEWS
- Activists: The Bottom Line for '99
-Liberte, Egalite, Parite
-NOW Does Hollywood
-Opinion: Abortion and Crime
-Women on the Verge of 2000
-Mexico City's Women Traffic Cops
-Opinion: Guns and Lobsters
-Indian Women Sue Canadian Feds
- Under Fire: The Year of the Gun
 
 

 

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TIME SAVERS In 1901, it was spin city for women when the electric washing machine transformed their lives from dudsville to sudsville. The burdensome task of food preparation--which almost always fell to women--got a bit easier in 1924, when naturalist Clarence Birdseye introduced FROZEN FOOD into the kitchen and the lexicon. It finally gave women what they'd had little of before--time. With Earl Tupper's 1946 introduction of plastic storage containers knows as TUPPERWARE, leftovers got new life and millions of women got a source of income selling Tupper-goods. By 1998, a Tupperware party was being held somewhere in the world every 2.2 seconds.

HARDHAT The introduction of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and quotas for federally funded projects in 1978 brought more and more women into traditionally male strongholds such as the construction trades. MORTARBOARD Since the beginning of the century, women have been scaling the ivory towers. In 1900, women made up one third of all college students. Today, it's more than half.
HARDHAT The introduction of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and quotas for federally funded projects in 1978 brought more and more women into traditionally male strongholds such as the construction trades. MORTARBOARD Since the beginning of the century, women have been scaling the ivory towers. In 1900, women made up one third of all college students. Today, it's more than half.
A "ROSIE" POSTER Women proved that there was no job a man could do that a woman couldn't also do when they worked in the factories replacing America's man during World War II. Savoring their first taste of financial independence, many women found it hard to go back to housework after the war ended. MOUSE Clicker in hand, women in the eighties and nineties started to create global networks for organizing, activism, and online bonding.
INTERNATIONAL LADIES GARMENT WORKERS UNION LABEL The first union in an industry of primarily women, the ILGWU trumpeted the presence of women in the labor movement. Women proved themselves to be fierce agitators as they organized strikes and improved hours, wages, and safety conditions. At the close of the century, the union boasted 350,000 members. BUSINESS CARDS OF FORTUNE 500 CEOS By 1999, only three women headed Fortune 500 companies--proof positive that the glass ceiling exists. Though more women work for pay out of the home, there is still precious little room at the top.
 
           
     

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