We Heart: Gloria Steinem’s Powerful Call to Action

Ms. co-founder Gloria Steinem shared a powerful message about the importance of voting in the upcoming election.

Steinem describes the power every individual has, regardless of race, class or gender: “The voting booth is the only place on earth where we are equal.”

At the polls is where women and people of color—still fighting for social, political and economic equality—have the same voting power as white men. And by exercising this power, we can greatly affect the outcome of the election.

The impacts of the coronavirus pandemic should also shape how we think about this election, Steinem says:

“The virus is teaching us something. The virus pays no attention to gender, race, class—and neither should we. We’re all human beings.”


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The past months have shown the need for unity in the face of national and global issues, from the fight for racial justice to the global efforts to combat coronavirus—something Steinem calls “a new consciousness.”

Steinem concludes her statement by reminding viewers of the existential duty to vote:“Unless we vote, we do not exist.”

Moreover, the gender gap in U.S. politics—apparent in every election since 1980—often means women voters have the power to greatly shift and impact the results of an election. Polling has shown that the 2020 election could see record gender gaps in the voting tendencies of men and women, driven in large measure by women of color.

In order for election results to accurately represent the desires of all people in the U.S., we must do all we can to turn out the vote in the 2020 election.

Ms. has put together some ways you can get involved:

Get Involved

Become an Election Day poll worker. For specific information on how to get become a poll worker in your state, head here.

Join a voter protection program.

Register to vote and urge others to register.


The coronavirus pandemic and the response by federal, state and local authorities is fast-movingDuring this time, Ms. is keeping a focus on aspects of the crisis—especially as it impacts women and their families—often not reported by mainstream media. If you found this article helpful, please consider supporting our independent reporting and truth-telling for as little as $5 per month.

About

Marissa Talcott is a rising sophomore at Claremont McKenna College majoring in Philosophy and Public Affairs. She is a Ms. editorial and social media intern.