“Black Feminist Rants” Podcast Creates Crucial Space for Youth Activism and Reproductive Justice

“Black feminists have added three of the most important contributions to feminism: intersectionality from Kimberle Crenshaw; identity politics from the Combahee River Collective; and reproductive justice. Feminism cannot exist without reproductive justice—and the mainstream feminist movement is indebted to Black feminists and the Black feminist movement. … You cannot have a feminist movement or framework that doesn’t include and center those on the margin” says LaKia Williams, host of new podcast, Black Feminist Rants.

Naya Rivera: How “Glee” Helped Femme Lesbians Feel Seen

Naya Rivera’s tragic passing earlier this year has prompted many to look back on her legacy on “Glee.” In the years since its departure from the airwaves, Rivera’s portrayal of Santana Lopez is still making an impact in the lives of lesbian and bi women. As one of the few lesbian TV characters to ultimately have a happy ending, her story was ground-breaking and impactful from start to finish.

“The Road Not Taken”: Fighting for Women’s Rights in Weimar

The following is an excerpt from “The Road Not Taken”—the debut novel, out September 4, by feminist playwright, documentarian and writer Susan Rubin. In the book, one woman traverses through space and time on an epic journey of self-discovery—and in an effort to change world history.

“Stop staring at me,” I said. “Figure out how a woman my size could overpower this huge bully with nothing but my rage. Find your own rage before it is too late. You will not survive what is coming if you are complicit.”

Film “Never Rarely Sometimes Always” is a Feminist Odyssey

Abortion is largely defined by the politics that surround it. Mainstream art and media overwhelmingly reduce abortion to a topic of political and religious controversy, of culture wars and red-state legislation. Rarely is it treated as what it is: a highly personal health care decision.

But “Never Rarely Sometimes Always,” a new movie written and directed by Eliza Hittman, does just that.