Being a Woman in Politics Shouldn’t Come with Death Threats

Women in leadership roles often face violence and harassment. This public abuse sends a distinctive message to all women and girls: Beware what happens when you step outside the roles prescribed for you.

Unless Congress steps up and enacts laws recognizing violence against women in politics as crimes, abusers will continue making public life a hostile place for women.

What Would It Take to Double the Representation of Women in Congress By 2050?

As the U.S. celebrates the fairly meager victories for women candidates in the 2020 election and compare our progress to our democratic allies around the world, there is much to learn from New Zealand’s successful transition to a mixed-member proportional system.

In order for the United States to make serious and sustained progress toward parity by 2050, we must invest our energy and our resources in systemic reforms that address the structural barriers women face as candidates and elected officials.

Georgia Senate Candidates on the Issues

The election didn’t reveal a decisive winner for either Georgia Senate seat—which means Tuesday’s runoff election will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

Here’s where the Georgia Senate candidates—Sen. Kelly Loeffler, Rev. Raphael Warnock, Sen. David Perdue and Jon Ossoff—stand on the issues, from COVID-19 and immigration, to criminal justice and the economy.

The Future of Breastfeeding Is No Longer Over Toilets—Thanks to Sen. Duckworth’s Friendly Airports for Mothers Improvement Act

Nursing mothers need to pump regularly or they can be exposed to certain health risks, but U.S. airports have long lacked dedicated spaces for breastfeeding.

Fortunately, that will change with the recent passage of The Friendly Airports for Mothers Improvement Act. The legislation, introduced by Sen. Tammy Duckworth, requires small airports to have designated lactation spaces by 2023.

Georgia Residents: Everything You Need to Know to Vote in the January Runoff

During the 2020 presidential election, two U.S. Senate seats were up for grabs in Georgia. In both races, none of the candidates received the needed 50 percent of the vote to win, meaning Georgia will have a general election runoff on January 5, 2021.

The election results will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate. Voters have until December 7, 2020 to register to vote in the runoff.