“When Women Vote”: Celebrating Protest, Power and Progress

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the suffrage amendment, the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County opened up a new digital exhibit: “Rise Up LA: A Century of Votes for Women” on August 18.

The virtual discussion series is organized around three questions:

How have women’s protests changed history? Why don’t women’s votes put more women in power? And what are today’s women fighting for?

Saluting Inspiring Women and Girl Athletes Across Generations

“Don’t let anyone define your dream,” Megan Rapinoe—two-time Women’s World Cup champion, Olympic gold medalist and equal pay activist—declared from the stage at the Women’s Sports Foundation’s 40th Annual Salute to Women in Sports. “Dream way bigger than anything you’re seeing right now. Hopefully, we’re setting the groundwork for the next generation to be massive […]

Equality Can’t Wait: Women, Power and Progress

#EqualityCantWait, declared Melinda Gates—as she put her very significant resources forward today, challenging all of us, at every gathering and with every opportunity, to elevate, activate, motivate and gather our strength, individually and collectively as a global sisterhood, for the often dangerous but absolutely necessary work to move towards true equality in every aspect of our lives and work—not for ourselves alone.

Killing Us Softly: Then and Now

For generations, Jean Kilbourne’s documentary film Killing Us Softly: Advertising’s Image of Women has been transforming consciousness by revealing how the advertising industry promotes impossible beauty norms to make women insecure so they will buy products. To mark the 40th anniversary of the film, feminists across the generations gathered at Smith College to celebrate Kilbourne’s legacy.

Killing Us (Not) So Softly

This year marks the 40th anniversary of Jean Kilbourne’s pioneering film, “Killing Us Softly,” which examined how images of women in ads influenced how society views women. At a recent event at Smith College, she explored the impact of her work, and the fights that remain in ending media sexism.