Keeping Score: Democrats Demand Repeal of Global Gag Rule; Sexual Harassment Is Now a Military Code Offense; Black Voters Eager to See First Black Woman to Supreme Court

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: Mississippi abortion ban threatens future of Roe v. Wade; McDonald’s employees pursue anti-sexual harassment and discrimination training; Democrats demand permanent repeal of global gag rule; California signs Equal Pay Pledge; same-gender couples face $30,000 income gap; and more.

Domestic Violence: A Global Problem Requiring a Global Solution

I joined the activist movement nearly 30 years ago. The first year, I worked alone with no funding in a room the size of a closet. Approximately 700 women reached out for support.

Today, one in three women worldwide will suffer from domestic violence. A coalition of grassroots women’s rights activists, including myself, along with medical experts and human rights attorneys from all corners of the world are advocating for a solution: a new global agreement to end violence against women and girls.  

Most Anticipated Reads for the Rest of Us 2022

I’ve spent the last few months scouring catalogs and websites, receiving hundreds of books and even more emails from authors, publicists and publishers, reading your book Tweets and DMs, all to find out what books are coming out in 2022 that I think you, my exceptional, inquisitive and discerning Ms. readers, will want to hear about. 

There are 101 incredible books on this list. I’ve been a professional book jockey for 15+ years and I am encouraged to see more books each year that reflect the lives we actually lead. There’s always more work to be done and more to be written, but I’ve reason to be hopeful. So let’s get to it!

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: The U.S. Lags Behind Its Peers on Women in Elected Office; Who Are the Black Women Who May Fill Breyer’s Vacancy?

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: the U.S. lags behind peers when it comes to women elected to office; the Black women qualified to fill Breyer’s vacancy; which movies pass the all-important Bechdel test?; strategies helping to elect women in Wales, Scotland and Chile; and more!

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Black Women Are Already Front-Runners in Statewide Primaries; Efforts to Pass ERA Ramp Up

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: Black women establish themselves as early front-runners in statewide primaries; New Jersey must track data on the gender and race of appointees to state boards and commissions; efforts to pass the ERA in 2022; advances for women around the globe; RSVP for RepresentWomen’s Solutions Summit for a 21st Century Democracy; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation; Rest in Power, Lani Guinier; NY Gov Kathy Hochul Is Shaking Things Up for Women; Black Women Are Just 6% of U.S. House

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: New York Gov. Kathy Hochul’s term limit legislation could provide more women the chance to run and win; Minneapolis’s Andrea Jenkins is the first openly trans city council president in the U.S., and Seattle’s Debora Juarez marks same milestone for Indigenous people; Sheila Cherfilus-McCormick’s election brings the percentage of Black women in the U.S. House to 6 percent; Xiomara Castro, the incoming woman president of Honduras; the legacy of voting rights champion Lani Guinier, who died on Jan. 7; and more.

‘Marea Verde’ Feminist Collective Defends the Right To Decide in Mexico: “Sick and Tired of Seeing Our Sisters Go to Jail”

The Marea Verde—or “green wave” in English—is a collective of feminists based in Mexico. The group provides legal, psychological, moral and social support with the goal of eliminating and eradicating violence against women and advocating for the decriminalization of abortion.

“Thousands of women die every year from clandestine abortion because it is seen as a crime here in Mexico. We are sick and tired of seeing our sisters go to jail and being made to look like second-class citizens,” said Yunitzilim R. Pedraza, legal counsel to the group. “Abortion is a personal decision. Women should be supported and not criminalized for it.”

“Any Day They Could Deport Me”: Immigrant Children in Legal Purgatory

There are more than 44,000 child immigrants trapped in the Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) backlog, waiting to apply for a green card. In the meantime, they are vulnerable to deportation, homelessness and abuse.

Children from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala in particular must wait an average of four years to receive green cards after first applying for SIJS. As Congress and the Biden administration push for immigration protections, SIJS children have been left out.