What Tishaura Jones’s Mayoral Win Says About the Political Power Of Black Women

Tishaura Jones was elected Tuesday as the first Black woman mayor of St. Louis, the latest in a recent surge of Black women running for and being voted into positions of power in major U.S. cities.

“The phenomenon of Black women winning mayoral seats isn’t happening in a vacuum. There’s this real surge of Black women and women of color more broadly in city-level elected offices across the country.”

Law Enforcement Officers Keep Arresting Black Women Elected Officials

“Black women’s bodies are a site for state-sponsored violence.”

A growth in Black women’s representation in statehouses and other levels of government in recent years has increased their political power. Black women elected officials often are the ones who challenge policies over issues like police killings, racist monuments and voting restrictions.

It has also led to increasingly visible resistance, with several Black women being arrested or facing criminal charges in the midst of their work in statehouses or in their communities.

Some Lincoln Project Founders Knew About Sexual Harassment Allegations as Early as March

The Lincoln Project—an organization that raised nearly $90 million for its stated mission of defeating Donald Trump and Trumpism at the ballot box in 2020—is facing a rapidly escalating controversy over allegations that one of its co-founders, John Weaver, sexually harassed more than a dozen young men, including some working for the project.

Some of the leaders of the embattled organization knew about sexual harassment allegations against co-founder John Weaver as early as March.

“I Am Just Out of Energy This Year”: In a Pandemic Holiday, Women Still Do It All

Pressure and guilt, in all their forms, converge around this time every year, when the invisible work women typically do at home gets ratcheted up a few notches for the holidays. Add to that the pandemic, which has claimed more than 300,000 U.S. lives and, at its worst point, 20.8 million jobs. People are burnt out. Women most of all.

And yet, the household work—who keeps track of what groceries to buy, what appointments to make, the outfits needed for the holiday photos—continues to fall on women, as it historically has.