Black Women, Hip-Hop & #MeToo: ‘On the Record’ Spotlights Music Industry

“On the Record”—which premieres on HBO Max on Wednesday, May 27—gives voice to women survivors, suggesting a pattern of predatory behavior from Def Jam co-founder Russell Simmons, who has been accused of assault by 20 different women.

“I would love to see our stories believed with the same passion and fervor that black women support and believe men when they say they have been victims of police brutality and violence.”

I’ll Miss TV’s Annalise Keating, and the Complexity of Black Women

“So many professional black women who reach the highest ranks of their professions wear the armor, as Annalise does. … To err is human. But if you live in a society that doubts your humanity as a black person, let alone as a black woman, then the stakes are higher for those struggles and perceived failings. Every imperfection is used as proof positive of what white supremacy says about black people.”

The Ms. Q&A: Madame Gandhi on Creativity and Feminism—During COVID and Beyond

“Unfortunately, we are in a world that takes so much offense to being feminine, that we try not to be. … We are constantly aspiring to masculine standards, instead of being brave enough to see what it is that femininity brings to the table.”

By 2019, Gandhi had released two EPs as Madame Gandhi, opened for Ani Difranco, toured with Thievery Corporation, played Bonnaroo and numerous other festivals, and been named one of Forbes’ 30 Under 30 in music for 2019.

The Ms. Q&A: Adrienne Lawrence Wants You to Stay in the Game—and Fight Back Against Sexual Harassment

Adrienne Lawrence was the first on-air personality to sue ESPN for sexual harassment. In her new book Staying in the Game, Lawrence lays down her hard-earned knowledge about what it takes to face down “harassholes,” identify and avoid toxic workplaces and demand accountability for bad behavior that, for too long, has pushed women out of workplaces.

Coming Out (in Whatever Ways Are Most Uncomfortable)

“Living in secrecy breeds fear and makes it very difficult to organize with others for better treatment. Even though the risk is great, many have found it worthwhile to free themselves and empower others in the process.”

Abigail Saguy’s new book, Come Out, Come Out, Whoever You Are (Oxford, 2020), offers a fascinating and powerful analysis of how various groups are using “coming out” to gain personal power, allies and increased civil rights.