Femicide: The Need To Name Gender-Based Killing of Women in the United States

The U.S. downplays the growing issue of gender-based killings and violence by failing to call it what it is: femicide.

Recent high-profile murders have received immense media coverage, but the reality is they aren’t rare events. Femicide is a global issue that disproportionately impacts BIPOC women and requires urgent action to prevent. The U.S. needs to adopt a language of femicide that recognizes the gendered nature of ongoing murders of women in the nation, as well as the larger social patterns connecting them.

Abortion Bans, Feminism and Sexism Fuel Sally Edelstein’s Art: “Whatever We’re Exposed to Has An Impact On Us”

Award-winning collage artist and blogger Sally Edelstein calls herself a “visual anthropologist” and describes her intricate works as ”nostalgia-based.”

“Politics and art are one,” said Edelstein. “Nothing I do is without social content. That’s my interest.”

“Whatever we’re exposed to has an impact on us as we come of age. I want people to think about the messages they’re taking in.”

Elizabeth Warren “Pinkie Promises” to Keep Fighting for Feminism

Sen. Elizabeth Warren talks her new children’s book, the importance of connecting with youth and the future of feminism.

“The pinkie promises I’ve made with thousands of girls will stay with me always,” Warren said. “Those promises are a reminder of our strength, and I hope this book will encourage even the youngest readers to dream big—because that’s what girls do.”

Out-of-Body Image: How Media Teaches Young Girls to Hate Their Bodies and Young Boys to Objectify Them (Spring 2008)

A steady diet of exploitative, sexually provocative depictions of women feeds a poisonous trend in women’s and girls’ perceptions of their bodies. A strategy to counter one’s own tendency to self-objectify is to make a point of buying products, watching programs and reading publications that promote more authentic women’s empowerment

October 2021 Reads for the Rest of Us

Enjoy this month’s list of 30 feminist books from writers who are women, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, AAPI, LGBIA+, queer, disabled and more. They all have a hint of enchanting, irresistible, impudent or irreverent imaginary within them. Some more than others. Can you find it? 

Keeping Score: House Passes Women’s Health Protection Act With Roe Under Fire; U.S. Soccer Offers Identical Contracts to Women and Men

This week: Providers stand up to Texas six-week abortion ban; U.S. Soccer to grant men’s and women’s teams equal contracts; Boston to elect first woman of color as mayor; 710 Indigenous people are missing in Wyoming; today’s children will experience three times as many climate disasters as their grandparents; and more.

Race, Disability and Coercive Control: One More Look at the Gabby Petito Case

Two features of Petito’s case have been strikingly absent from media coverage: her disability, and the myriad signs that Petito’s boyfriend was subjecting her to a form of domestic violence known as coercive control.

Yet Petito’s disability was central to how the system failed her prior to her death. Her case also shows what happens when law and society oversimplify domestic violence and overlook coercive control.