Why Has Paid Leave Generated Such Broad Support? Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: Melinda French Gates on the imperative of passing paid leave; the powerful effect of gender balance rules for public boards in Massachusetts; in Albania, women now make up the majority of the cabinet; Canada’s election leaves women’s representation at a standstill; the impact of gender quotas on women’s political representation in Ukraine; the Ranked Choice Voting Coalition launched in California; and more.

Women on Their Choice To Be Child-Free

World Contraception Day—September 26—was conceived (no pun intended) to improve awareness of all forms of contraception and help people make informed choice about their sexual and reproductive health. In honor of this important day, I interviewed women of multiple generations about their choice to be child-free. 

Over Half of College Sexual Assaults Happen Between Orientation and Thanksgiving. Here’s How to Protect Survivors

More than half of sexual assaults on campus occur between orientation and Thanksgiving—a period known as the “Red Zone.” And with the amount of new students on campus doubling as a result of COVID-19, these numbers risk being doubled as well.

With campus awareness and mental health support, we as students, faculty, family and community can reclaim Red Zones.

The U.S. Still Hasn’t “Forgiven Haiti for Being Black”—And Modern Immigrants Are Paying the Price

In an 1893 speech examining the U.S. relationship with Haiti, Frederick Douglass said: “A deeper reason for coolness between the countries is this: Haiti is [B]lack, and we have not yet forgiven Haiti for being [B]lack or forgiven the Almighty for making her [B]lack.”

U.S. Border Patrol agents rounding up asylum seekers with whips while thousands more languish under a bridge in the unrelenting Texas heat make it clear: 128 years after Frederick Douglass’s speech, his words still ring true.

The Trauma of COVID-19 Persists as College Reopens

“Everyone is just wanting to have a collective sigh of relief—‘Oh, we’re back in school and everything’s gonna be okay again’—when in fact, there are people who are still struggling significantly and will continue to do so.”

“The pandemic isn’t over. But even if and when it is, your trauma doesn’t just miraculously go away the day everyone is vaccinated and there’s no more spread of the illness, it takes time to recover.”