Britney Spears and the Right to Reproductive Justice: Regulation and Conservatorship in the Child Welfare System

The similarity between Britney Spears’s limitations in decision-making regarding her reproductive decisions and the regulation of the child welfare system on poor, disabled, minority parents is clear. Their individual rights to choice and privacy are erased and structural limitations imposed on them.

Spears’s fame has brought attention to a major issue—but the same energy needs to remain for everyone fighting for their freedom within a system actively working against them.

From West Coast to Westminster, Five Feminist College Students on the Importance of Study Abroad

Five students reflect on the lessons they’ve learned and a unique perspective they’re developing while studying abroad with in a program focused on feminist pedagogies and content.

“We are the surgeons of humanity, trying to repair the damages inflicted by our ancestors while at the same time perfecting our technique so our tomorrow is an improvement from yesterday.”

U.S. Military’s Male-Dominated Culture Harms More Than Just Women

Major gender gaps persist in the U.S. armed forces, negatively impacting operational effectiveness, military culture and compliance with international law, according to a report released by the Georgetown Institute for Women Peace and Security.

To ensure women’s meaningful participation, the report suggests that women must be promoted to leadership positions and their input must be valued. To do so, the military must adopt better and more complete childcare and parental leave policies and decouple physical fitness standards from advancement.

When It Comes to Family Policies, the Public Doesn’t Want to Pick and Choose

Sen Joe Manchin said he would not vote for a “reckless expansion of government programs,” and has reportedly demanded progressive Democrats “pick one” of Biden’s three family policies included in the bill: extending the child tax credit; childcare; or paid family and medical leave.

But most Americans don’t see investments in critical family policies as reckless—and they don’t want to choose between them.

Ms. Global: Muslim Leaders Make Women’s Rights Plea to Taliban; Pakistan Reckons with Femicide and #JusticeForNoor

The U.S. ranks as the 19th most dangerous country for women, 11th in maternal mortality, 30th in closing the gender pay gap, 75th in women’s political representation, and painfully lacks paid family leave and equal access to health care. But Ms. has always understood: Feminist movements around the world hold answers to some of the U.S.’s most intractable problems. Ms. Global is taking note of feminists worldwide.

This week: A former senior diplomat in Israel alleges late-President Shimon Peres sexually assaulted her in the ’80s; Morocco’s new Parliament elects most women ministers in country’s history; Soccer players in Venezuela and Australia join the global #MeToo movement; Pakistan struggles to come to terms with a gruesome femicide; and more.

Together in Song: Women’s and LGBT Choruses Safely Thrive Amidst the Pandemic

Women’s and LGBT choruses have used communal singing to network in support of social causes. The COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose major challenges for arts and culture involving the prohibition of large, in-person gatherings. However, these choruses are not just surviving, but thriving—thanks to their savvy use of digital networks and webs of long-standing relationships.

Families Depend on Congress to Pass Paid Family and Medical Leave—Mine Included

Whether someone is navigating a child’s serious health needs, a cancer diagnosis, a parent’s stroke, the birth of a new child, or so many other personal events that shape our lives, all U.S. workers—not just those like me who happen to live in one of the nine states or D.C. that has passed a paid leave law—deserve to be there for their loved ones when we are needed most.