Fighting for Freedom and Abolition from Across the Border

Free-soil havens abroad formed the international stage upon which the fight to end American slavery took place.

Weaving together themes of Black mobility, information circulation, jurisdictional dispute, and transnational abolitionism, ‘Beacons of Liberty’ investigates the individual and collective influence these international free-soil havens had on the American anti-slavery movement over the 50-year period between 1813 and 1863.

Black Women in Support of the Equal Rights Amendment: “A Victory Over Right-Wing Racist Sexism”

From Pauli Murray to Barbara Jordan to Shirley Chisholm, Black women have been an essential part of the fight for the Equal Rights Amendment.

“The adoption of the Equal Rights Amendment, and its ratification by several states, could well usher in an unprecedented golden age of human relations in our national life, and help our country to become an example of the practical ideal that the sole purpose of government is to create the conditions under which the uniqueness of each individual is cherished and is encouraged to fulfill his or her creative potential,” said Pauli Murray.

Is Juneteenth for Everybody?

“We are grateful for Texas, for Galveston—but what happened in Texas didn’t only happen there. Freedom was eventual but it was not an event. It was episodic, but not confined to one episode. Juneteenth is for everybody Black. It is but the enduring Black freedom celebration in a range of Emancipation Day celebrations that Black people have used to mark belated freedom.”

Black Feminist in Public: Tiya Miles Explores the Historical Baggage of Slavery

This week leads into the weekend celebration of Juneteenth, honoring the emancipation in 1865 of those who were enslaved in this country. The Black Feminist in Public series will highlight three scholars of slavery studies and Black women’s histories.

Our third and final focus is Tiya Miles, professor of history at Harvard University and author of All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley’s Sack, a Black Family Keepsake.

Black Feminist In Public: Jessica Marie Johnson on the Importance of Slavery Studies and Knowing Black Sexual Histories

This week leads into the weekend celebration of Juneteenth, honoring the emancipation in 1865 of those who were enslaved in this country. The Black Feminist in Public series will highlight three scholars of slavery studies and Black women’s histories.

First up: Jessica Marie Johnson, associate professor of history at John Hopkins University and author of Wicked Flesh: Black Women, Intimacy, and Freedom in the Atlantic World.