Women Aren’t “Opting Out” of the Work Force. They’re Being Forced Out

Crushed by the load of caregiving, women are leaving workplaces in droves, and the wage gap is an important motivator.

“A more accurate description of ‘opting out’ is in fact women being forced out of work—forced out by companies that never really wanted us there anyway, forced out by managers who are not amenable to being flexible, forced out by partners who are not willing to pick up their part of the load at home, and forced out by constantly being ground down through silencing, erasure and plain old everyday sexism in our paid work.”

Amy Coney Barrett’s ‘Happy Go Lucky’ Haitian Children and the White Savior Narrative

Despite the national political drama that is swirling, in many ways, last week’s Senate hearings to approve Justice Amy Coney Barrett were uneventful (especially in comparison to the confirmation hearings that took place two years ago for Brett Kavanaugh). But, for me as a Haitian-American scholar who writes about representations of Haiti and Black girlhood, there was a moment that disturbed me.

It Was Never About Saving Babies. It Was Always About Motherhood.

There is perhaps no better (or eerier) reminder of the insidious, underlying idea that women are destined to be mothers than the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to fill RBG’s spot on the Supreme Court.

Barrett is not “the new face of feminism”; this is a repackaged misogyny guised behind a smiling mother—a mother that values this identity so much, she wants to create a world where giving birth is no longer a choice, but a legal mandate.

Afghanistan Will Now Include Mothers’ Names in Children’s Birth Certificates

Afghan mothers will have their names printed on their children’s national identity cards, thanks to the #WhereIsMyName campaign, which challenged taboos around women’s names.

President Ashraf Ghani on Thursday signed into law an amendment long sought by women’s rights campaigners.

Until now, Afghan law dictated that only the father’s name should be recorded on ID cards.

Using a woman’s name in public in Afghanistan is traditionally frowned upon and can be considered an insult.

A Roof of One’s Own

In this personal essay, Ms. contributor Suhasini Yeeda shares her reflections on the house she grew up in.

She writes, “By the time I was gifted the back room, there were neither parties nor full houses. It was just my mom and me and the silence about our shared history spent in my father’s house before his passing. There was everything that came after this loss. Before and after, there was the roof.”