Time’s (Still) Up: Rewriting Our Film History

The conversation around film history today still revolves around predominantly male and white producers, directors and more. Even in 2020, the American Film Institute’s list of 100 Greatest American Films of All Time has not one female director.

In order to widen the conversation in the future, we must amend how we look at the past. The time is up—and for many of us, it has been up for quite a while.

Feminist Lens: Cheryl L. Bedford’s Vision for a Diverse and Inclusive Hollywood

Founder of the largest—and one of the only—diversity and inclusion initiatives focused exclusively on women of color in the film and television industry, Cheryl L. Bedford sees no use in maintaining the status quo.

“I used to say that women of color need to work twice as hard to be considered half as good; that’s what I was told as I was growing up. Now, I say that women of color should be able to be like mediocre white men and still get hired.”

Black Women, Hip-Hop & #MeToo: ‘On the Record’ Spotlights Music Industry

“On the Record”—which premieres on HBO Max on Wednesday, May 27—gives voice to women survivors, suggesting a pattern of predatory behavior from Def Jam co-founder Russell Simmons, who has been accused of assault by 20 different women.

“I would love to see our stories believed with the same passion and fervor that black women support and believe men when they say they have been victims of police brutality and violence.”

I’ll Miss TV’s Annalise Keating, and the Complexity of Black Women

“So many professional black women who reach the highest ranks of their professions wear the armor, as Annalise does. … To err is human. But if you live in a society that doubts your humanity as a black person, let alone as a black woman, then the stakes are higher for those struggles and perceived failings. Every imperfection is used as proof positive of what white supremacy says about black people.”