Oshun Energy in Beyoncé’s “Black is King”

We are certainly entering a new era when Beyoncé, our most celebrated Black pop star, can access a dominant worldwide corporation like Disney—responsible for some of the most troubling anti-Black representations for nearly a century—and utilize its platform to correct our image and offer us a grand, divine mirror to see ourselves anew. “Black is King” is Oshun’s mirror by way of Beyoncé’s artistic vision.

Black Women, Hip-Hop & #MeToo: ‘On the Record’ Spotlights Music Industry

“On the Record”—which premieres on HBO Max on Wednesday, May 27—gives voice to women survivors, suggesting a pattern of predatory behavior from Def Jam co-founder Russell Simmons, who has been accused of assault by 20 different women.

“I would love to see our stories believed with the same passion and fervor that black women support and believe men when they say they have been victims of police brutality and violence.”

Black Feminist in Public: Veronica Chambers on the Power and Meaning of Beyoncé

“I think people who dismiss her as somehow being a lightweight or a pretty girl with some lucky breaks—as if you can create at that level without thinking critically!—that is actually just another sign of misogyny and how women are discounted for what they create. When we make exquisite things, people assume there are fairies in the night who do it with magic dust instead of looking at the work and the research and the effort that goes into it.”

Black Feminist in Public: Celebrating Tricia Rose’s Milestone Year

Rose’s classic study, Black Noise: Rap Music and and Black Culture in Contemporary America, turned 25 this year—and was also named one of the top books of the 20th century by Black Issues in Higher Education. To mark the occasion, the American Studies Association featured a panel celebrating Rose and Black Noise featuring hip-hop and black cultural scholars. Rose sat down for an interview with Ms. to talk about hip-hop, feminism and the state of popular culture.