Six Things You Can Do Today to #SavethePostOffice

Postal workers have worked through the coronavirus pandemic, keeping the country connected and providing an economic lifeline to businesses and a means to necessities for many. But the crisis has decimated postal revenue, while costs have increased.

The Postal Service urgently needs a $25 billion appropriation from Congress to get through the crisis intact. On Saturday, the House of Representatives approved $25 billion in postal funding, in a 257-150 vote that included 26 House Republicans. While the Senate has not approved the funding, bipartisan pressure is building.

Following the House bill, House Democrats on Monday questioned Postmaster Louis DeJoy, a major GOP donor, at a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing. Lawmakers raised concerns about DeJoy’s close ties to the president and the Republican party, as well as his history as an executive and shareholder (between $30.1 million and $75.3 million in assets, to be exact) at USPS contractors and competitors, such as the controversial XPO Logistics. In addition, Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.) grilled DeJoy about his sale of Amazon stock following his appointment to the top role in June.

The movement to protect the beloved Postal Service is demanding elected officials and Postmaster General DeJoy:

  • Provide at least $25 billion in immediate support for the Postal Service.
  • Stop and reverse the mail slowdown policies introduced by Postmaster General DeJoy.

The pressure must continue to build. Here’s what you can do to help #SaveThePostOffice.

Attend an event.

Find an event to attend near you, searching by zip code.

Host your own #SaveThePostOffice event.

If you don’t see an event near you yet, sign up to host a #SaveThePostOffice event at your local post office! When you sign up to host, you’ll get access to a simple host guide and live webinars for training and support.


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Make your voice heard.

Every one of us has our own unique reason for needing the Postal Service. What’s your reason? Record a video and help spread the word to #SaveThePostOffice. Upload it here once complete, and share on social media!

Buy stamps.

It may sound small, but the Postal Service actually gets most of its funding from stamp sales. Luckily, stamps are available for online purchase.

Six Actions You Can Take Today to #SavethePostOffice
USPS even has a stamp to commemorate this year’s suffrage centennial. (USPS)

Bonus points: If you really want to relieve USPS of delivery costs, you can simply buy stamps and hold onto them as collectibles. Shop stamps here!

Vote early.

If you plan to vote by mail, voting early can help ensure the Postal Service is not overwhelmed, and be guaranteed your vote is counted. Check Vote.org to explore your state’s early-voting rules.

Six Actions You Can Take Today to #SavethePostOffice

Contact your members of Congress.

The Postal Service is in crisis, caused by the coronavirus, and Congress needs to act, urgently.

In July, American Postal Workers Union (APWU) members made 30,000 calls to Congress. Join them by calling yours and urging them to support at least $25 billion in stimulus funding for the Postal Service.

To get connected, dial (844) 402-1001 or use this APWU form.


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About

Roxy Szal is the associate digital editor at Ms.