When It Comes to Family Policies, the Public Doesn’t Want to Pick and Choose

Sen Joe Manchin said he would not vote for a “reckless expansion of government programs,” and has reportedly demanded progressive Democrats “pick one” of Biden’s three family policies included in the bill: extending the child tax credit; childcare; or paid family and medical leave.

But most Americans don’t see investments in critical family policies as reckless—and they don’t want to choose between them.

Families Depend on Congress to Pass Paid Family and Medical Leave—Mine Included

Whether someone is navigating a child’s serious health needs, a cancer diagnosis, a parent’s stroke, the birth of a new child, or so many other personal events that shape our lives, all U.S. workers—not just those like me who happen to live in one of the nine states or D.C. that has passed a paid leave law—deserve to be there for their loved ones when we are needed most. 

A 50-Year Fight to Add Women’s Equality to the Constitution: Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: how new grants will help advance women’s representation in state legislatures; the 50-year fight for the ERA; the 2022 race for governor of New York state is heating up; outcomes for women in the recent elections in Canada; Egypt’s impressive number of women judges; the legacy of Angela Merkel’s leadership; and more.

Sens. Manchin and Sinema Should Consider the Cost of Failing to Invest in Care Infrastructure

Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) were elected to represent their constituents. But they are ignoring the cries of working families and caregivers, mothers of color in particular, by sitting on a much-needed $3.5 trillion investment that could address the decades-long fiscal neglect of low- and moderate-income families and communities. 

A Devastating Supreme Court Decision on Sexual Assault Shows Why the U.S. Needs the ERA Now

When she was a college freshman in 1994, Christy Brzonkala was gang-raped by two students at Virginia Tech. Brzonkala turned to a law newly passed called the Violence Against Women Act—and her case made it to the Supreme Court, where women’s right to equal protection from violence ultimately died.

When passed, the Equal Rights Amendment would spark Congress to enact new laws on gender violence, including redrafting the Violence Against Women Act civil rights remedy, and chart a path to overturn Brzonkala’s devastating decision.

Paid Leave to Save Your Life

The paid leave proposal in the Build Back Better plan would specifically provide paid leave for people who need to “find safety from assault, stalking and sexual violence.”

The recognition and inclusion of people who experience intimate partner violence in the Build Back Better plan’s proposal for federal paid family and medical leave is a path-breaking step in supporting a population who is often invisible in the workplace.