Front and Center: For Nikki, Guaranteed Income Means Financial Security, Community and Hope for the Future

Front and Center is a groundbreaking series of op-eds—published by Ms. and created in partnership with the Magnolia Mother’s Trust—which aims to put front and center the voices of Black women who are affected most by the often-abstract policies currently debated at the national level. The series highlights the success of Springboard to Opportunities’ Magnolia Mother’s Trust program, which this year will give $1,000 per month for 12 months to 100 families headed by Black women living in federally subsidized housing.

Colleges Must Support Student Parents Even After COVID

No category of college students has been harder hit than one that is often invisible: students who are also mothers (and fathers). Despite being largely left out of the national higher ed conversation, student parents make up about one-quarter of all college students, and face barriers like soaring college costs and lack of affordable childcare and housing.

Moving the Apostrophe in Mother’s Day: Helping Mothers Around the Globe

Mothers’ Day Movement (MDM) was founded by a small group of women who believe in making a difference for women around the globe.

“Americans are expected to spend $25 billion this Mother’s Day on flowers, earrings and meals. Go ahead: These women are worth it and more! But let’s remember that a tenth of that sum would save large numbers of lives of moms around the world. The Mothers’ Day Movement is a worthy effort to honor mothers in part by saving mothers’ lives.”

Front and Center: For Danel, Guaranteed Income Will “Make Such a Difference”

Front and Center is a groundbreaking series which aims to put front and center the voices of Black women who are affected most by the often-abstract policies currently debated at the national level. The series highlights the success of Springboard to Opportunities’ Magnolia Mother’s Trust program, which this year will give $1,000 per month for 12 months to 100 families headed by Black women living in federally subsidized housing.

“Growing up the way I did, which was hard, really shaped the way I am—valuing education, working hard. I just want my kids to have a better life than my sister and I did. Sometimes, when I was younger, I had this feeling like I was living in an abandoned house; I don’t ever want them to feel that neglect.”