Nasrin Sotoudeh, Iranian Rights Lawyer, Home Temporarily: “We Are Hoping for a Better Future That Can Protect Us”

Iranian human rights attorney Nasrin Sotoudeh is home from prison on temporary medical leave. That is a simple thing to write, but there is so much emotion, strength, sacrifice, vision and history involved. And so much at stake in what will come next.

“It’s very difficult to be there,” she continued, “but I carry a sense of beauty that is very sustaining from making new friends and having an opportunity to continue my work. For instance, an hour before leaving I was advising a particular prisoner about her legal case. I can help these women appeal for their rights and freedom. That is deeply rewarding.'”

In Texas, Voting Rights Four-Day March Ends in Capitol Rally With Thousands in Attendance

On Saturday, a four-day, 27-mile Selma-to-Montgomery style march from Georgetown—a suburb north of Austin—ended with a rally at the Texas Capitol attended by almost 10,000 people. The rally was the culmination of a four-day march from Georgetown, a suburb north of Austin, which began on Wednesday, as a way to pressure the U.S. Congress to pass voting rights legislation.

Youth of Color Take Action in Preventing Sexual Harassment in Bay Area

In order to make Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) safer for females and gender-expansive people, Reminie Chaidez and 99 other paid youth joined forces with Alliance for Girls to launch a campaign against gender-based violence in the country’s fifth largest transit system.

“Youth are the legacy of public transportation. We want other people to take this as an example and ask their local transit agencies to do the same.”

Meet VIISTA: The Program Training Non-Lawyers to Represent Migrants in Court

Pistone designed and founded an entirely online educational program called Villanova Interdisciplinary Immigration Studies Training for Advocates (VIISTA). The program is designed to meet the demand for immigrant representatives by taking advantage of a long-standing facet of immigration law that allows non-lawyers approved by the Department of Justice (DOJ) to represent migrants in immigration court. Called “accredited representatives,” these non-lawyers work at DOJ recognized organizations—such as faith-based or immigrant advocacy groups—who are permitted to provide low-cost legal representation to migrants under federal regulations.