‘The People’s Lawyers’: Attorneys General Letitia James and Dana Nessel on Reclaiming and Rebuilding U.S. Democracy

On Sept. 7, Ms. recorded a “fireside chat”-style discussion with Attorneys General Letitia James (N.Y.) and Dana Nessel (Mich.)—two trailblazers in the fight for justice and democracy—moderated by election administration expert and governor of the United States Postal Service, Amber McReynolds.

Here are our favorite moments of that conversation.  

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Queen’s Death Is a Reminder That Systems Matter; Is Liz Truss on the Side of Women?

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation in politics, on boards, in sports and entertainment, in judicial offices and in the private sector in the U.S. and around the world—with a little gardening and goodwill mixed in for refreshment!

This week: Maura Healey may become Massachusetts’ first woman governor and the nation’s first openly lesbian governor; Brits aren’t so sure if PM Liz Truss is truly on the side of women; the longest any monarch has ever served in British history, Queen Elizabeth II has died; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Brittney Griner’s Detention Matters for All Women; Is Serena Williams Retiring on Her Own Terms?

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation in politics, on boards, in sports and entertainment, in judicial offices and in the private sector in the U.S. and around the world—with a little gardening and goodwill mixed in for refreshment!

This week: Is Serena Williams retiring on her own terms?; progress for women in Kenyan politics; India falls behind for parity; Brittney Griner’s detention is a travesty; women of color are well-positioned to take power after the Minnesota primaries; New York Times endorses three white men; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: The 174th Anniversary of Seneca Falls Convention; The GOP Is Failing Millennial Moms

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: the 174th anniversary of the Seneca Falls Convention; coalition-building is how we advance women’s representation; the status of women’s representation in Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine; the GOP is failing millennial moms; and more.

There’s a Simple Solution to Elect More Women and Eliminate Partisan Gerrymandering

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: how proportional ranked-choice voting would eliminate gerrymandering; the U.S. ranks 27th in women’s equality; women gain seats in Japan’s House, surpassing U.S. House; flooding, heat waves and economic insecurity threaten women’s lives in particular; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: How We Build a 21st Century Democracy; 85% of Election Administrators Are Women

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: how all of us can get involved to build a 21st century democracy; 85 percent of local election administrators are women; a must-watch race in Alaska; women will hold nearly 40 percent of seats in the Australian lower house, thanks largely to ranked-choice voting; the growing demand in Kenya to elect more women; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Primary Results Suggest Gains for Women in Congress; the Impact of Women Voters

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: European Union will require an “underrepresented gender” fill at least 40 percent of board seats; Women are on track to make gains in the U.S. Congress; Australia elected record numbers of women to Parliament in last month’s elections; the impact of women as voters; and more.

How Women Are Breaking Into the ‘Boy’s Club’ of Politics, in Oregon and Beyond: Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: For the first time, three women candidates will run in Oregon’s 2022 governor race; how women can break into the “boy’s club” of politics; a setback for women’s representation on corporate boards; Wales expands the number of seats in their parliamentary body; and more.

What Moms in Politics Really Want This Mother’s Day: Campaign-Funded Childcare

There are several obstacles moms face when entering politics—a big one being the lack of universal, affordable childcare.

For moms entering a political career at any level, allowing campaign funds to be used for childcare expenses is a critical first step to leveling the playing field for women candidates to run and win. Campaign-funded childcare means that both men and women candidates would no longer need to factor in childcare costs when deciding to run, which would blow open the doors for more and diverse women candidates to get their names on the ballot.

SCOTUS Wants Reproductive Rights Left Up to the States—Whose Representatives Are Still Overwhelmingly White and Male

The Supreme Court says it is time to “return the issue of abortion to the people’s elected representatives.” But state legislatures are overwhelmingly white and male: Women hold just 31 percent of statehouse seats, and only 9 percent are women of color. Rates of women’s representation are much lower in states that will ban abortion if and when Roe is overturned.

Luckily, we know how to transform the demographics of U.S. law-making bodies. We just need the political will.