Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: How Black Suffragists Fought for Voting Rights; Women’s (In)Equality Day; Former Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell Challenges Rick Scott

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: Despite Women’s Equality Day celebrations, the disparities in women’s representation—particularly in employment, wages and government—are still significantly low compared to our male counterparts; the numerous Black suffragists forgotten by history: Mary Church Terrell, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Fannie Lou Hamer, Ida B. Wells, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Fannie Barrier Williams, Sojourner Truth, Lugenia Burns Hope, Mary McLeod Bethune and Nannie Helen Burroughs; Democrat Debbie Mucarsel-Powell is running for Senate, posing a challenge to incumbent Republican Senator Rick Scott; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Senate Could See Third Black Woman Senator in 234 Years; Key Races in Boulder and St. Paul

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: the release of the 10th annual Gender Parity Index fueled discussions about U.S. women’s representation on social media; This November, Boulder will have its first ranked-choice mayoral contest; five women individually filed their candidacies for the St. Paul City Council; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Ohio’s Rejection of Issue 1 is a Win for Ballot Measures; Democracy and Women’s Empowerment Are Linked

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: New Jersey state Rep. Sadaf Jaffer is leaving office due to the mental, emotional and sometimes physical trauma of serving in the public eye; Kalamazoo, Mich., has adopted a resolution to implement ranked-choice voting for mayoral and city commissioner elections; the findings of the 2023 Gender Parity Index; and more.

Black Women Are Still Underrepresented in U.S. Politics. They Need Funding to Fairly Compete.

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: Abortion remains a salient issue for primary voters; around the world, there is still a notable lack of women in leadership roles; Virginia’s state elections in November; “We need to stop sending women to a broken system,” says Melinda French Gates; Dutch finance minister stepping down to protect her family from threats against her; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: How Inequality Affects Women in Film; What Barbie Can Teach Us About the Gender Wage Gap

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: Movies like Barbie and Oppenheimer are impossible without actors and writers, and women are still getting paid less in the industry; Christopher Nolan’s film had the opportunity to mention critical women of the atomic age but failed; Emily’s List’s new Madam Mayor program will “serve as a critical touchpoint” for woman mayors to receive support; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: It’s Time for Women (Statues) to Join Men on the National Mall; Gender-Balanced Legislatures Are Key to Democracy

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: Delaware’s General Assembly shows promising signs of change; ranked-choice voting bill introduced in Pennsylvania state legislature; The National Mall has yet to dedicate an independent monument to women, despite recent legislation that was passed to create one; countries with greater peace, reduced military expenditures, and a heightened focus on environmental concerns correlate with more gender diversity in legislatures; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: SCOTUS Is ‘Making History for the Wrong Reasons’; America Had More Than One Founding

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: America has far more than just one set of founders; the architects of American democracy were inspired by the system of checks and balances practiced by Indigenous peoples; why the number of women candidates filing to run for office is lower than in recent years; and more.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Affirmative Action and the Supreme Court; Ranked-Choice Voting Reaches Arlington, Va.

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: Ranked-choice voting helps reassure voters they can vote for the candidate they want rather than who they think will win; the Supreme Court has two cases on its docket that will determine the future of affirmative action; Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester (D-Del.) could become the third Black woman to ever serve in the U.S. Senate; and more.

Celebrate Juneteenth by Electing Black Women

Even now, 158 years after the first Juneteenth, our elected leaders remain overwhelmingly white and male. Even as white women saw marginal gains in political representation, progress for Black women has been infuriatingly slow. Black women candidates for elected office must fight bias on multiple fronts—not just at the ballot box, but all along the way to get there. And party leadership often wants to throw their money behind a less politically “risky” candidate, further entrenching the state of affairs.

We know how crucial representation is to building a new generation of leaders. As intersectional feminists, we have a responsibility to dismantle the barriers to a truly representative democracy.