‘The Suffrage Road Trip’: A Tribute to Two Middle-Aged, Lesbian, Immigrant Suffragists

In “We Demand: The Suffrage Road Trip”, middle-aged lesbian Swedish immigrants Ingeborg Kindstedt and Maria Kindberg advocate for women’s suffrage in 1915.

I fell in love with Ingeborg and Maria when I retraced their route in 2015, and was astonished to find they’d gotten so little recognition for all they did—likely because they were older, working class women who spoke accented English.

Today in Feminist History: Suffragists Flock to National Women’s Rights Convention (September 8, 1852)

The convention will continue two more days, and the struggle will go on for as long as may be necessary. But if future advocates of equality for women have the same dedication as those present today, there is no doubt that Elizabeth Oakes Smith’s prediction of victory will prove true, and those who can say they were among the first to begin the work of winning total equality for women will be especially honored.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: The Imperative of Women’s Leadership

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: We need to be laser focused on adding more women to the state legislatures; find out more about women’s representation in your state; Gov. Kathy Hochul has appointed two women to top leadership positions in her cabinet; the new woman head of the AFL-CIO; and more.

Rally for ERA on Women’s Equality Day: No Time Limit on Equality

As we witness the renewed attacks on women’s fundamental rights in Afghanistan and remember how quickly women’s rights in this country were rolled back during the Trump administration, we are reminded how critical it is that we secure final ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment in the U.S. Constitution.

On Thursday, Aug. 26, leaders and activists working for the Equal Rights Amendment will gather in front of the Supreme Court, across from the U.S. Senate, to rally for the ERA.

“Her Flag” Celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment

“The flag is often associated with men and their accomplishments, and over the years has become associated with conservative Americans. But the flag is supposed to represent all of us,” said visual artist Marilyn Artus.

For the creation of Her Flag, Artus planned to travel to all 36 states that voted to ratify, in order of ratification, over a time span of 14 months to work with the state artists creating a stripe for Her Flag and sewing it onto the 18- by 26-foot flag.

Today in Feminist History: N.A.W.S.A. Looks to Future of Women’s Suffrage (March 24, 1919)

Though nothing is ever certain in politics, there do appear to be enough votes in the new Congress to pass the Susan B. Anthony Amendment by the two-thirds majority required and send it to the states for ratification by 36 of 48. Regardless of whether that final step in the ratification process takes place before next year’s Presidential election or not, the end of the struggle is in sight, so it’s definitely appropriate to begin thinking about how women’s votes can best be used after the battle to win them is over.