Ms. Global: Historic Kenyan Elections; Malaysia Passes Anti-Sexual Harassment Bill; Germany Introduces Self-Determination Act

The U.S. ranks as the 19th most dangerous country for women, 11th in maternal mortality, 30th in closing the gender pay gap, 75th in women’s political representation, and painfully lacks paid family leave and equal access to health care. But Ms. has always understood: Feminist movements around the world hold answers to some of the U.S.’s most intractable problems. Ms. Global is taking note of feminists worldwide.

This week: news from India, Germany, Malaysia, Iran, and more.

Keeping Score: Rep. Ernst Blocks Birth Control Access Bill; Democrats Urge Biden to Extend Student Loan Pause; Amelia Earhart Statue Unveiled in U.S. Capitol

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: Massachusetts bill will strengthen reproductive rights for college students; Justice Alito defends his ruling in the name of “religious liberty”; Rep. Cori Bush introduces legislation for reproductive health services; WNBA star Brittney Griner sentenced to nine years in prison; Hong Kong guarantees space for women on company boards; and more.

The Best and Worst States for Gender Parity—and What Works to Increase It

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: the best and worst states for women’s representation and gender parity; what’s working around the globe to increase percentages of women in office; the presence of women artists at MoMA; the vital connection between the work for gender equity and the work to address climate change; and more.

Ms. Global: Iranian Women Unveil in Protest; Hungary Sued Over Anti-LGBTQ Law; Sierra Leone Overturns Abortion Ban

The U.S. ranks as the 19th most dangerous country for women, 11th in maternal mortality, 30th in closing the gender pay gap, 75th in women’s political representation, and painfully lacks paid family leave and equal access to health care. But Ms. has always understood: Feminist movements around the world hold answers to some of the U.S.’s most intractable problems. Ms. Global is taking note of feminists worldwide.

There’s a Simple Solution to Elect More Women and Eliminate Partisan Gerrymandering

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: how proportional ranked-choice voting would eliminate gerrymandering; the U.S. ranks 27th in women’s equality; women gain seats in Japan’s House, surpassing U.S. House; flooding, heat waves and economic insecurity threaten women’s lives in particular; and more.

Abortion Providers From Around the World Share the Dangers of Practicing Under Bans

Over the last 30 years, only four countries have restricted access to abortion: Poland, El Salvador, Nicaragua and the U.S. While the leaked Supreme Court decision is cause for alarm, it is also a reminder of how far we’ve come, and why we cannot turn back the clock in countries that have liberalized abortion. Stories of abortion providers in Cambodia, Ethiopia and Nepal of life before their countries legalized abortion show the U.S. how restricting abortion rights can endanger women’s lives.

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Why Gender-Balanced Cabinets Matter—And How We Get There

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: why gender-balanced state Cabinets matter, and how we get there; Connecticut elects its first Black woman chief public defender; a much-needed feminist history lesson; Cambodia sees an increase in women candidates running for elected office; and more.

Leaked SCOTUS Opinion Relies on Misinformation and Tropes of the Anti-Abortion Movement

In the leaked opinion, Justice Alito’s use of the language “abortion-on-demand” is intentionally stigmatizing—it forwards the idea that pregnant people make capricious, immoral decisions to terminate their pregnancies. But abortion access is not the free-for-all that Alito intimates.

In fact, abortion law, in the U.S. or across the world, has not been a story of long criminalization with the blip of Roe over the last 50 years. Rather, the trend, on the whole, has been support for abortion rights and laws that reflect it.