Want to Protect Abortion? Look to Kansas

On Aug. 2, Kansas voters will decide whether or not to amend the Kansas Constitution to explicitly state that nothing in it creates a right to abortion. If passed, the amendment would allow the state legislature to pass laws banning and restricting abortion. The activists behind the amendment are attempting to overturn a 2019 Kansas Supreme Court decision that protected a woman’s access to abortion.

If anti-abortion extremists are successful in passing the constitutional amendment in Kansas, millions of Americans will be left in an abortion desert.

Kansas Voters Overwhelmingly Reject Anti-abortion Amendment in Primary Election

If passed, a proposed constitutional amendment on Kansas’ primary ballot in August would allow more than 20 laws restricting abortion to stay in effect, including mandatory ultrasounds and biased counseling to discourage abortion, a 24-hour waiting period, parental consent for minors, a 20-week abortion ban, a ban on telemedicine abortion and limitations on public funding and insurance coverage for abortion.

Feminist and equity-focused groups urge Kansas voters to vote “no” on the amendment.

Our Democracy Has Problems. Women Have Solutions.

The U.S., one of the world’s oldest democracies, is now seeing a rise of antidemocratic views. But never fear. We come bearing good news. There is hope. And that hope, we believe, is the shared power and potential of mobilized women to forge a new movement for a 21st century democracy.

We hope you are inspired and encouraged by what this slate of women experts—working at all levels to reform and revitalize our democracy—have to say. And to hear more about democracy solutions and how you can get involved, join us March 8–10 from 3–5 p.m. ET for RepresentWomen’s democracy Solutions Summit, which brings together experts and leaders in election administration, voting rights and democracy reform who are working on innovative solutions that upgrade and strengthen our democracy.

Georgia Residents: Everything You Need to Know to Vote in the January Runoff

During the 2020 presidential election, two U.S. Senate seats were up for grabs in Georgia. In both races, none of the candidates received the needed 50 percent of the vote to win, meaning Georgia will have a general election runoff on January 5, 2021.

The election results will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate. Voters have until December 7, 2020 to register to vote in the runoff.

Keeping Score: Election Milestones You May Have Missed

While the history-making presidential race has captivated the attention of those both at home and abroad, a significant number of down-ballot victories also mark historic milestones in U.S. politics.

Several states continue to count incoming votes, due largely to the record number of mail-in ballots this year. But several takeaways are already abundantly clear: More Americans voted this year than in any past election—resulting in countless firsts for people of color, LGBTQ+ candidates and women.