Federal Policy Has Failed To Protect Indigenous Women

On Indian reservations, Indigenous victims of physical violence by acquaintances or strangers, and all victims of sexual assault and stalking, have little recourse other than to rely on a federal criminal justice system that has consistently failed to prosecute their attackers.

One way to remedy this longstanding problem is for the reauthorization of VAWA to expand tribal jurisdiction to cover all crimes of violence against women committed on Indian reservations, irrespective of the race or the relationship of the victim and perpetrator.

Now Should We Speak Femicide?

Men sometimes kill women because they are women. Sometimes, as is likely the case with the horrific killings in Atlanta, men kill women because they are women and because of other aspects of their identity—race, sexual orientation, disabilities. But still, because they’re women. This gendered killing of women has a name: femicide, coined by Diana Russell almost 30 years ago.

After Atlanta: Four Steps to Building a Future Free of Racism and Gender-Based Violence

“The violence our communities experience every day won’t be solved by more police. It won’t be solved by more people crowding our prisons. Those structures have failed us, time and time again, and they are rooted in and upheld by the same white supremacy that fuels these attacks.”

In the wake of the horrific anti-Asian racism and hate crimes in Atlanta, we need to fight for community-led solutions to help us heal. Here are four.

The Ms. Must-Read: House Achieves Victories for Gender Equality

It’s been an extraordinary week of legislative victories for women’s equality—but also one of profound tragedy.

This week, the U.S. House of Representatives advanced two critical measures, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). The votes came the day after a murderous rampage in Atlanta that left eight people dead, six of them Asian American women.