We Heart: ACLU Dedicates Full-Page Ads to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

We Heart: ACLU Dedicates Full-Page Ads to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is dedicating a full-page ad to honor Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who first rose to national prominence as an ACLU lawyer fighting for equal rights for women. The organization will also be dedicating the ACLU Center for Liberty as the Ruth Bader Ginsburg Liberty Center in Justice Ginsburg’s honor.

The full-page ad will run in print and online across the country all week, appearing at first in print in The Washington Post on Sunday and The New York Times on Monday. The page celebrates Justice Ginsburg’s life work, which established the foundation for the current legal prohibitions against sex discrimination and helped lay the groundwork for future women’s rights and gender equity advocacy.

“Justice Ginsburg recognized that dismantling patriarchy is necessary not only for women’s liberation, but for all of us to have the freedom to thrive regardless of gender,” said Ria Tabacco Mar, director of the ACLU Women’s Rights Project. “Just as she never gave up, so too we will use each day to carry forward her legacy of fighting for gender justice.”


Here at Ms., our team is continuing to report through this global health crisis—doing what we can to keep you informed and up-to-date on some of the most underreported issues of this pandemic. We ask that you consider supporting our work to bring you substantive, unique reporting—we can’t do it without you. Support our independent reporting and truth-telling for as little as $5 per month.


Ginsburg began volunteering for the ACLU in the late 1960s and joined as the founding director of the ACLU Women’s Rights Project in 1972.

While at the ACLU, Ginsburg played a role in 34 Supreme Court cases, and won five of the six cases she argued before the court. Many of her cases involved sex discrimination against men, which she felt might rouse more sympathy among the male justices, and show that discrimination hurts everyone. By 1974, the Women’s Rights Project and ACLU affiliates had participated in over 300 sex discrimination cases.

An obituary by ACLU executive director Anthony D. Romero can be found here.

You may also like:


The coronavirus pandemic and the response by federal, state and local authorities is fast-movingDuring this time, Ms. is keeping a focus on aspects of the crisis—especially as it impacts women and their families—often not reported by mainstream media. If you found this article helpful, please consider supporting our independent reporting and truth-telling for as little as $5 per month.

About

Eva Lopez is a communications strategist at the ACLU.