For an Equitable Economy in 2021, We Must Center Black Women. Here Are Four Ways How.

To create an economy where Black women can succeed, we must center Black women in policy solutions, following the Black Women Best principle: “If Black women—who, since our nation’s founding, have been among the most excluded and exploited by the rules that structure our society—can one day thrive in the economy, then it must finally be working for everyone.”

Not a Moment but a Movement: The Case for Transitional Justice in the U.S.

The United States has a history of exporting principles of human rights and democracy around the world. Now the world looks on, in the wake of recent high-profile killings of unarmed Black Americans, including George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. Is the U.S. prepared to confront its own truths?

In 2020, the U.S. needs transitional justice—an important practice whenever there has been a lack of accountability and redress for widespread and systemic harms. (Sound familiar?)

What to Expect From a Biden Presidency: On LGBTQ+ Equality

President-Elect Joe Biden has pledged to pursue an aggressive plan to advance LGBTQ+ equality in the U.S. and around the world. After four years of the Trump administration rolling back LGBTQ+ rights at home and abroad, Biden has his work cut out for him.

The Biden-Harris administration plans to move the U.S. toward a government-wide focus on uplifting of LGBTQ+ people at home and abroad.

In the Battle Over Abortion, Polish Feminists with Disabilities Are Claiming Their Rights

In a disturbing irony, Poland’s decision to remove the “fetal defect” grounds for abortion will have a disproportionately negative impact on the lives and well-being of women with disabilities.

Indeed, Polish feminists with disabilities have brought powerful dissent and insights to the ongoing protests and discussions about abortion in Poland—both on- and offline.

“Invisible Women”: Excluding 50 Percent of the World’s Population Has Real Consequences

For too long, women have been invisible in world affairs, and this invisibility of approximately 50 percent of the world’s population has real consequences. It leads to incomplete and inaccurate pictures of reality, which in turn leads to poorly planned policies, or perhaps a lack of policies in issue areas that need them.

Ultimately, the invisibility of women in world affairs leads to unnecessary pain and suffering, for women and men alike.