In the Battle Over Abortion, Polish Feminists with Disabilities Are Claiming Their Rights

In a disturbing irony, Poland’s decision to remove the “fetal defect” grounds for abortion will have a disproportionately negative impact on the lives and well-being of women with disabilities.

Indeed, Polish feminists with disabilities have brought powerful dissent and insights to the ongoing protests and discussions about abortion in Poland—both on- and offline.

“Invisible Women”: Excluding 50 Percent of the World’s Population Has Real Consequences

For too long, women have been invisible in world affairs, and this invisibility of approximately 50 percent of the world’s population has real consequences. It leads to incomplete and inaccurate pictures of reality, which in turn leads to poorly planned policies, or perhaps a lack of policies in issue areas that need them.

Ultimately, the invisibility of women in world affairs leads to unnecessary pain and suffering, for women and men alike.

The Ms. Q&A: Nobel Laureate Nadia Murad Fights for Justice for Yazidi People and for Survivors of Sexual Violence

Nadia Murad is a survivor. In 2014, when she was just 19 years old, ISIS militants carried out a genocide against her Yazidi community, a minority group of 500,000 people in Northern Iraq.

Today, Murad is working to bring ISIS to justice for their genocide against the Yazidi community and rebuild what ISIS destroyed in Iraq through her organization Nadia’s Initiative.

The Ms. Q&A: Jennifer Weiss-Wolf on What the U.S. Can Learn From Scotland’s Period Products Law

Scotland recently became the first nation in the world to mandate all period products in the country will be free for anyone who needs them.

Jennifer Weiss-Wolf, menstrual equity expert and founder of Period Equity, discusses the historic nature of Scotland’s new law; how it’s going to work, in practice; how we might model it in the U.S.; and how COVID is affecting menstrual equity here in the States.

Being a Woman in Politics Shouldn’t Come with Death Threats

Women in leadership roles often face violence and harassment. This public abuse sends a distinctive message to all women and girls: Beware what happens when you step outside the roles prescribed for you.

Unless Congress steps up and enacts laws recognizing violence against women in politics as crimes, abusers will continue making public life a hostile place for women.

What Women Can Expect from a Biden Presidency: On Ending Violence Against Women

Biden’s pledge to end violence against women centers on reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), restoring Title IX protections against sexual harassment and assault on college campuses, and increasing protections and programs for women in marginalized communities—including Native American women, adolescent girls of color, LGBTQ+ individuals, older women, women and girls with disabilities, immigrant women, and women service members.