Turning Point in History: U.S. Sends the Most Diverse Delegation to CSW65

The U.S. Delegation to CSW65 is a historic turning point in U.S. political leadership and marks the first time the U.S. will be represented at the session at the White House level, and the first time two women of color have co-led the delegation: Vice President Kamala Harris and U.N. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield.

Plus, meet the historic eight non-government advisors joining the U.S. Delegation who are changing the game.

From the Vault: “Dispatch from Beijing” (Jan/Feb 1996)

The United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women (September 4–15, 1995) was ground-breaking and revolutionary, forcing participants to realize that all issues are “women’s issues.” But attendees also had to suffer dirty, crowded conditions, disrespect and downright misogyny.

“Why did women endure such treatment? For each other’s sake. (This is how they get us.)”

Table for 12, Please: Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield, “The People’s Ambassador”

When President Biden announced Linda Thomas-Greenfield as his pick for U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, he lauded her as a “seasoned and distinguished diplomat with 35 years in the foreign service who never forgot where she came from growing up in segregated Louisiana.”

On Tuesday, the Senate confirmed Thomas-Greenfield by a vote of 78-20, marking a return to a career of foreign service where she excels.

Intersectionality, Accountability, and the United Nations

Gender parity doesn’t necessarily mean the U.N. is working better, and towards the interests of women, girls and marginalized populations. If the U.N. is to “leave no one behind,” it must fully grasp the multiple forms of discrimination holding people back.

It’s time U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres accepts and takes on recommendations for making intersectionality central to the U.N.’s mandate.