Ms. Global: Muslim Leaders Make Women’s Rights Plea to Taliban; Pakistan Reckons with Femicide and #JusticeForNoor

The U.S. ranks as the 19th most dangerous country for women, 11th in maternal mortality, 30th in closing the gender pay gap, 75th in women’s political representation, and painfully lacks paid family leave and equal access to health care. But Ms. has always understood: Feminist movements around the world hold answers to some of the U.S.’s most intractable problems. Ms. Global is taking note of feminists worldwide.

This week: A former senior diplomat in Israel alleges late-President Shimon Peres sexually assaulted her in the ’80s; Morocco’s new Parliament elects most women ministers in country’s history; Soccer players in Venezuela and Australia join the global #MeToo movement; Pakistan struggles to come to terms with a gruesome femicide; and more.

Despite Impressive Wins at Paralympics, Few Disabled Women in Elected Office: Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: Despite impressive wins at the Paralympic Games, very few disabled women serve in elected office; the absence of women in the safety testing of vehicles is a matter of life and death; women’s leadership in the nonprofit sector; the imperative of adding the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution; the desperate situation for women in Afghanistan now; how electoral rules in South Africa impact women’s representation; Boston women running for mayor deserve ranked-choice voting; and more.

Women’s Soccer, a $1 Million Donation and a Warehouse Job Claim the Podium

Title Nine, a women’s sport apparel company in California, recently donated $1 million to the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team in an effort to narrow the wage gap.

As for equal access, Title Nine proved pivotal in my literary career: For having missed, in the late 1990s, my deadline for a major book project, I found salvation in a part-time, holiday season warehouse packing job with the company. 

What is the Legacy of the “Gender-Equal” Tokyo 2020 Games?

When the IOC announced last winter that Tokyo 2020 would be “the first gender-equal Olympic Games,” they were touting the near 50% representation of female athletes, an all-time high.

Now that the summer games have concluded, the IOC statement turned out to be prescient in other unexpected ways: fierce feminism has been on full display for the past two weeks as athletes boldly broke norms and pushed back against sexist protocols and practices.

On Simone Biles, Black Women and the Space Between the Leap and the Land

“Simone Biles’s plight felt to me like both metaphor and matterphor for Black ascension—a kind of disorientation that attends to Black excellence, the discomfiture that comes in those fleeting moments, where having pulled off something great, you feel like you are on top of the world, and yet, curiously, terrifyingly, you also have no idea where you are in the air.”

Women Olympic Athletes and Activists Harness the Spotlight: Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: Olympic gender parity does not mean equity; women Olympians give support to social and political movements; what it’s like to be a mother and an Olympian; how to shift power to women, people of color, and younger people; and more!

Keeping Score: Paralympic Medalists Achieve Equal Pay; U.S. Women’s Soccer Gets Support From Men’s Team in Equal Pay Lawsuit; Bipartisan Jan. 6 Investigation Begins

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: top U.S. athletes advocate for gender equality and mental health support; Paralympic athletes receive equal compensation for first time in history; U.S. drug distributors could owe $26 billion for their role in the opioid epidemic; Democrats push for women’s inclusion in the military draft; Argentina becomes first Latin American country to issue gender neutral IDs; and more.

The Cost of One Olympic Sexual Abuse Survivor’s Fight for Justice

Mandy Meloon—widely recognized as one of the best taekwondo athletes in the U.S.—was told she could compete in the Beijing Olympics only if she took back her allegation that her coach and his brother were sexually and financially abusing her.

On August 8, the last day of the Tokyo Olympics, Meloon and the other taekwondo survivors will fly to Colorado where a class-action lawsuit alleging “intentional, reckless and negligent acts” committed by
the United States Olympic Committee, including USA Taekwondo, “toward their own athletes” might get resolved.