The Ms. Q&A: Nobel Laureate Nadia Murad Fights for Justice for Yazidi People and for Survivors of Sexual Violence

Nadia Murad is a survivor. In 2014, when she was just 19 years old, ISIS militants carried out a genocide against her Yazidi community, a minority group of 500,000 people in Northern Iraq.

Today, Murad is working to bring ISIS to justice for their genocide against the Yazidi community and rebuild what ISIS destroyed in Iraq through her organization Nadia’s Initiative.

Being a Woman in Politics Shouldn’t Come with Death Threats

Women in leadership roles often face violence and harassment. This public abuse sends a distinctive message to all women and girls: Beware what happens when you step outside the roles prescribed for you.

Unless Congress steps up and enacts laws recognizing violence against women in politics as crimes, abusers will continue making public life a hostile place for women.

Violence Against Women Deserves More Than a 16-Day Campaign

Reports of violence against women and girls during the COVID-19 pandemic have increased around the world as many women and girls are locked down in their homes with their abusers, isolated from support networks and services.

The international community needs to take concrete actions to fund responses to combat violence against women and girls year-round—not just during an annual 16 day campaign.

What Women Can Expect from a Biden Presidency: On Ending Violence Against Women

Biden’s pledge to end violence against women centers on reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), restoring Title IX protections against sexual harassment and assault on college campuses, and increasing protections and programs for women in marginalized communities—including Native American women, adolescent girls of color, LGBTQ+ individuals, older women, women and girls with disabilities, immigrant women, and women service members.

Restless Is the Social Media Platform Fighting Sexual Assault

Olivia DeRamus on Restless, her new social media platform for women and sexual violence survivors.

“I knew I had to find a way to empower myself again within the circumstances I couldn’t change. I thought that maybe if I couldn’t tell my own story, I could at least facilitate the stories of other women. That maybe I could speak indirectly through them, and feel like I was reclaiming my narrative, even if indirectly.”