Keeping Score: Paralympic Medalists Achieve Equal Pay; U.S. Women’s Soccer Gets Support From Men’s Team in Equal Pay Lawsuit; Bipartisan Jan. 6 Investigation Begins

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: top U.S. athletes advocate for gender equality and mental health support; Paralympic athletes receive equal compensation for first time in history; U.S. drug distributors could owe $26 billion for their role in the opioid epidemic; Democrats push for women’s inclusion in the military draft; Argentina becomes first Latin American country to issue gender neutral IDs; and more.

U.S. Acts Decisively to Protect Asian Americans—But Drags Its Feet on Protecting Black Americans

The COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act sailed through Congress with fanfare, while the human rights report on police violence was ignored by the U.S. media and government, and the bill to curb police violence is on life support in the Senate. What explains this combination of developments?

The unspoken message is that Asian American lives matter more than Black lives, and that the U.S government cares more about Asian Americans than it does about Black people.

How New York’s Ranked-Choice Voting Fared—and Where We Go From Here: Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: NYC’s ranked-choice voting election saw the highest turnout since 1989; how women are faring in the NYC city council race; top companies for gender parity; strategies for women incumbents to retain their seats; India Walton may become the first woman mayor of Buffalo; and more!

As AAPI Heritage Month Ends, We Must Recommit Ourselves to the Fight Against Racism and Anti-Asian Hate

Asian women have been overlooked, dehumanized and ignored by American society. When we are seen, we are often stereotyped as the “China Doll” or the “Dragon Lady.” We have been reduced to our perceived race and stripped of our individual humanity and identity.

If this can happen to two Asian leaders in the White House, then what is happening elsewhere across our country to Asian women with fewer resources?