Women in the ‘Remain in Mexico’ Program Must Now Be Given a True Chance To Seek Refuge

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that the Biden administration has the authority to terminate the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as Remain in Mexico, which requires some refugees to wait outside of U.S. borders while their cases are heard. The Biden administration must now immediately take all possible steps to end MPP.

Those waiting in Mexico, like the desperate women we met who are fleeing gender-based violence at home, must have an opportunity to pursue their claims from within the U.S. with the help of local organizations and legal service providers.

The Supreme Court Clearly Doesn’t Care About Women’s Lives

If we pay attention to those whose lives have already been destroyed by an inability to access abortion, we can see our collective future and the depths the challenges to come. Centering the voices of those who have struggled to get care—even as we recognize the implications of Dobbs on everyone—allows us to predict at least three immediate consequences of last week’s decision.   

The Differences Between UBI and Guaranteed Income Reveal the Importance of Equity

Many anti-poverty groups agree that strategically targeted guaranteed income, not universal basic income, is the best path forward to ending poverty, advancing gender and racial equity and supporting low-income Americans.

That’s why guaranteed income programs like the Magnolia Mother’s Trust (MMT) focus on low-income Black women to address the deeply entrenched economic inequities caused by systemic racism and sexism. MMT moms have used their monthly payments to go back to school, find stable housing, escape predatory cycles of debt and start their own businesses.

Alito’s Opinion Is a Blueprint for Rolling Back Civil Rights While Claiming To Protect Black Fetuses

The right-wing has been gunning for the gains of the civil rights movement, the women’s movement and the LGBT movement for decades. With Alito’s draft opinion, they have a blueprint for how to roll back these rights. They have now put in place a Supreme Court that is more than willing to carry out the goal of obliterating civil rights for historically marginalized people and solidify white male power. Moreover, Alito’s perspective ignores a long history of Black activism for birth control, abortion and reproductive justice, as well as the long-term alliance between white supremacist and anti-abortion movements. We cannot let them do this.

Resisting the Overturn of Roe: What U.S. Feminists Can Learn From El Salvador

In a grim moment nationally, let us look to Latin America for the sustained will to resist and overturn abortion bans.

Most notably, U.S. reproductive rights organizers should think of legal and cultural campaigns that can move across states. Though combatting abortion bans in the U.S. will be difficult because states exert their own jurisdiction over abortion laws, we can create a national movement and anticipate the challenges ahead through learning from Latin American feminists, especially the resilient people of El Salvador since 1998.

Brett Kavanaugh’s Yale Classmates Rally for Reproductive Rights at Class Reunion: ‘Keep Your Hands Off My Rights!’

Brett Kavanaugh was nowhere to be seen last Saturday when his Yale classmates attending their 35th college reunion held a rally to express their anger and frustration with their former classmate—as Kavanaugh is likely to join with other conservatives on the Supreme Court to reverse Roe v. Wade and end constitutional protections for the right to abortion.

Supreme Court conservatives Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh all graduated from Yale Law School. “What the hell are we doing here? How are we producing people who are taking away our longstanding constitutional rights?”