Under the Threat of Another Government Shutdown

The government might shut down this week (again). At the same time, House Republicans are trying to abolish the Women’s Bureau; cut the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission; slash maternal and child health support from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA); eliminate funding for Title X family planning; *and* reverse the FDA decision on the abortion pill mifepristone.

The Trump Trials Are Set to Begin in Georgia

Kenneth Chesebro and Sidney Powell—both former lawyers for Trump—were indicted by a Fulton County grand jury in mid-August, alongside 17 others, including Trump himself. All 19 co-defendants are charged under Georgia’s Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act.

On Thursday, Oct. 19, Powell pleaded guilty to six misdemeanor counts—five counts of conspiracy to commit intentional interference with performance of election duties, and one count of conspiracy to commit theft—making her the second defendant to flip on Trump and cooperate with prosecutors. Powell was supposed to go to trial on Monday with co-defendant Chesebro. With Powell’s plea deal, Chesebro will go to trial solo next week.

“The basic thrust is, is that while all of those defendants did slightly different things and engaged in slightly different discrete acts of criminal activity, they all were engaged in one unlawful purpose, which was to overturn the 2020 election,” said Anthony Michael Kreis, a professor at the Georgia State University College of Law, on a recent episode of On the Issues with Michele Goodwin.

Indictments Seek to Hold Trump Accountable for Threatening U.S. Democracy and National Security

As soon as next month, a grand jury out of Georgia will be tasked to consider charges against former President Donald Trump and his Republican allies for trying to overturn the 2020 election. Already, the Department of Justice has indicted former President Trump with 37 felony counts related to the mishandling of classified documents, obstructing justice, making false statements and conspiring.

“The worst thing you can do for a democracy is just let it slide when people try to do a coup and undermine democracy. That is how democracy dies. It is worth pursuing the fight to keep people accountable under the laws for undermining our democracy,” said Leah Litman, a professor at the University of Michigan Law School, on a recent episode of Ms.On the Issues With Michele Goodwin podcast. 

What Did Abortion Look Like Before Roe v. Wade?

What did abortion look like, in the pre-Roe era? If you lived in Chicago, there was a number you could call—and a woman named Jane would answer.

“The women of Jane performed 11,000 abortions between 1965 and 1973,” Booth said. “And when people take action we can save lives, we can make a difference, we can change the laws and change the future. And we have to take action as these very precious freedoms are under threat right now.”

Top Ten Most Memorable Moments from the First Year of “On The Issues with Michele Goodwin”

Did you know that Ms’s podcast “On the Issues with Michele Goodwin” has been reporting, rebelling and telling it like it is for one whole year?

We’ve covered a lot of ground over the past year, from interviewing your lawmakers to delving into a summer of resistance against police brutality to getting the perspectives of feminists on the front lines of changing culture—finding silver linings all along the way. Here are our top ten moments from the year.

Women’s Health Protection Act: Congress Has a Moral and Legal Obligation to Protect Abortion Access

Dr. Michele Goodwin testified powerfully in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution on the urgency of the Women’s Health Protection Act in addressing racial, gender, legal and health disparities.

“Reproductive justice requires every individual to have the right to make their own decisions about having children regardless of their circumstances and without interference and discrimination.”

“An Incredible Breach of Planning and Response”: Feminists Discuss the Insurrection at the Capitol

What does the Jan. 6 riot and insurrection at the U.S. Capitol signify for our nation? How and why could this have happened? Will the president be impeached? How are feminists and frontline activists supposed to process all this?

To begin to answer these questions and make sense of these unprecedented times, Dr. Michele Goodwin, journalist Jennifer Steinhauer and psychologist Patricia Jones Blessman led listeners this week in a frank, honest conversation, where they lay out the facts against the president and the domestic terrorism performed in his name.