Making Space for Diversity in Cybersecurity

Minority representation within the cybersecurity field is around 26 percent. Racial and ethnic minorities tend to hold non-managerial positions, and pay gaps, especially for minority women, persist.

The lack of diversity in the cybersecurity workforce makes it more vulnerable. Here’s how we can start making sure we’ll see more Black women on cybersecurity panels.

A Social Movement That Happens To Play Soccer

The U.S. is now the first country to grant equal pay for its men’s and women’s soccer teams. But for years, U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team players have repeatedly complained that they’ve been getting as little as 40 percent of the salary their male counterparts get—especially considering the women’s team has four World Cup titles and the men’s team has … none.

Keeping Score: Democrats Demand Repeal of Global Gag Rule; Sexual Harassment Is Now a Military Code Offense; Black Voters Eager to See First Black Woman to Supreme Court

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: Mississippi abortion ban threatens future of Roe v. Wade; McDonald’s employees pursue anti-sexual harassment and discrimination training; Democrats demand permanent repeal of global gag rule; California signs Equal Pay Pledge; same-gender couples face $30,000 income gap; and more.

Let’s Make This Another Year of the Woman—This Time for Governors

Thirty years after the 1992 Year of the Woman, women are still underrepresented in governor positions, but research shows there’s hope to increase these numbers: More than a dozen women are running for governor across the country, and it’s clear that women candidates have made great progress. However, women running for governor are still held back by sexist stereotypes and double standards. 

Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: The U.S. Lags Behind Its Peers on Women in Elected Office; Who Are the Black Women Who May Fill Breyer’s Vacancy?

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: the U.S. lags behind peers when it comes to women elected to office; the Black women qualified to fill Breyer’s vacancy; which movies pass the all-important Bechdel test?; strategies helping to elect women in Wales, Scotland and Chile; and more!

“We Know What We’re Doing”: How To Engage With Black Women Organizers Ahead of the 2022 Midterm Elections

To effectively engage communities of color ahead of the 2022 midterm elections, it’s time more groups include the expertise of Black women organizers in their strategies year-round. Yet the financial investments, resources, and above all, trust in Black women organizers’ work is nowhere to be seen as this year’s election cycle gears up.   

How to ‘Intention’ a Feminist World: Ringing in the New Year with Leadership Icon Gloria Feldt

For years, Gloria Feldt has focused on women’s leadership—and as we flip the calendar to 2022, her resolve is stronger than ever. I decided to find out more about her insights into women and power.

“One of the hardest things is to shift our focus from battling negative power reactively to embracing our positive power to implement change proactively and set our own agenda in a disciplined way.”

Keeping Score: Biden Signs Bill for Maternity Care, Reinstates “Remain in Mexico” Policy; More Evidence Supports COVID Vaccination During Pregnancy

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: Biden signs the first of 12 ‘Momnibus’ bills for veteran maternity care, and reimplements Trump’s Remain in Mexico policy; Stacey Abrams announced her second run for Georgia governor; Sweden’s first female prime minister resigns hours after appointment; CDC encourages vaccination of pregnant people; and more.