Weekend Reading on Women’s Representation: Celebrating AAPI Women Leaders; Lisa Cook Is First Black Woman on Federal Reserve Board

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation. 

This week: celebrating AAPI women leaders and exploring AAPI women’s representation; most countries provide part-time childcare access from the age of 3; Senate confirms Lisa Cook to the Federal Reserve Board; in the workplace, “the selection of incompetent men over competent women is the number one problem we need to fix”; and more.

Keeping Score: New Mexico’s Plan for Free Childcare; U.S. Median Age for Giving Birth Hits 30; Feminists Reckon With Likely Roe Reversal

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.
This week: A leaked Supreme Court draft decision would overturn landmark Roe v. Wade ruling; new library program will secure access to “banned books” for teens; Oklahoma Heartbeat Act bans abortion after six weeks; Karine Jean-Pierre appointed first Black White House press secretary; and more.

Yelp Joins Growing List of Companies Covering Costs for Texas Employees Seeking Abortions Out of State

Yelp Inc. said on Tuesday it will cover expenses for its employees and their dependents who must travel to another state for abortion services. Yelp joins Citigroup, Match Group, Bumble as the four publicly traded companies helping cover travel costs for Texas employees seeking abortions out of state—a necessity in the wake of S.B. 8, which bans abortions after six weeks. Clinics in Texas’s surrounding states have reported a nearly 800 percent increase in abortion patients since the law was enacted.

Come June, when the Supreme Court announces the end of Roe v. Wade as many experts predict, even more business leaders will feel the pressure to take a stand on the issue.

Return to Work Is Happening in Hybrid Form—But Is Hybrid Working for Women?

The structure of employment in the U.S. has long been untenable for anyone who has caregiving duties, but now that hybrid work is here—the flexibility of which women have been advocating for basically forever—is it enough?

A stark contrast to the benefits of hybrid work: It is precisely the people who need hybrid schedules the most who will end up paying the highest price. 

Is It 2157 Yet? How Businesses and Policymakers Can Accelerate the Timeline for Equal Pay

At our current pace, we won’t close the wage gap between men and women until 2157—nearly 136 years from now, with 36 of those added to make up for pandemic setbacks. We can’t hand off this injustice to our great-great granddaughters. So how can public policymakers, philanthropy and private businesses come together to accelerate the process?

There are solutions for narrowing the wage gap between men and women—let’s start by raising the federal minimum wage to $15; providing paid leave to all employees; and changing hiring practices.

Making Space for Diversity in Cybersecurity

Minority representation within the cybersecurity field is around 26 percent. Racial and ethnic minorities tend to hold non-managerial positions, and pay gaps, especially for minority women, persist.

The lack of diversity in the cybersecurity workforce makes it more vulnerable. Here’s how we can start making sure we’ll see more Black women on cybersecurity panels.

A Social Movement That Happens To Play Soccer

The U.S. is now the first country to grant equal pay for its men’s and women’s soccer teams. But for years, U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team players have repeatedly complained that they’ve been getting as little as 40 percent of the salary their male counterparts get—especially considering the women’s team has four World Cup titles and the men’s team has … none.

Keeping Score: Democrats Demand Repeal of Global Gag Rule; Sexual Harassment Is Now a Military Code Offense; Black Voters Eager to See First Black Woman to Supreme Court

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: Mississippi abortion ban threatens future of Roe v. Wade; McDonald’s employees pursue anti-sexual harassment and discrimination training; Democrats demand permanent repeal of global gag rule; California signs Equal Pay Pledge; same-gender couples face $30,000 income gap; and more.

Let’s Make This Another Year of the Woman—This Time for Governors

Thirty years after the 1992 Year of the Woman, women are still underrepresented in governor positions, but research shows there’s hope to increase these numbers: More than a dozen women are running for governor across the country, and it’s clear that women candidates have made great progress. However, women running for governor are still held back by sexist stereotypes and double standards.