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feminist wire | daily newsbriefs

August-02-13

Yale Fails Again to Handle Sexual Assault On Campus

Yale University released its annual "Report of Complaints of Sexual Misconduct" on Tuesday, revealing that all students recently accused of sexual assault will continue at the school.

The sixteen page report begins with an introduction from the University's Title IX Coordinator and then provides brief details on new cases brought to the University's attention within the last semester, as well updates on cases from previous reporting periods. This report follows a 2011 investigation by the U.S. Department of Education into Yale's sexual violence procedures and policies. As a part of the resolution, Yale was fined $155,000 and must comply with all regulations given by the Office for Civil Rights.

In the "Updates to cases previously reported" section, six cases (involving seven perpetrators) included "nonconsensual sex" or "nonconsensual acts." Of these seven men, four were given a "written reprimand," one was placed on probation, one received a two-semester suspension and probation, and one was not disciplined because the victim declined to cooperate. In many instances, the perpetrators were encouraged to seek counseling, and in all cases were "restricted from contacting the complainant." All seven were allowed to finish their degrees, five without any disciplinary interruption to their student life.

The newly reported informal complaint section contained two instances of nonconsensual sex or acts; in each case, the "Chair of the UWC and a Yale College administrator counseled the respondent on appropriate conduct." These two students will also continue at the school without interruption.

Student Alexandra Brodsky has spoken out against the lack of change she has seen in her school's treatment of sexual assault, criticizing Yale's "administrative tolerance for rape." She told reporters "It's so, so frustrating to have reported to the school, been let down by the school, brought it to the federal government and then get let down by the federal government." Hannah Slater, a Yale graduate student who helped start the Sexual Literacy Forum, said "It's really irresponsible [for Yale] to let known perpetrators of rape stay on campus alongside the survivor and alongside other students who could potentially be victimized in the future." Slater told the Huffington Post, "Most [victims of sexual assault] don't use the Yale complaint system because they don't trust that their needs will be served, and this report proves them tragically right."

Media Resources: Sources: Huffington Post 8/1/13; Jezebel 8/1/2013; Yale University 7/31/13;


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