Q&A: How Intersectional Poetry Can Inspire Young Girls To Be Themselves

Ms. writer Shanta Lee Gander recently talked with Diana Whitney about the ways her poetry anthology “You Don’t Have to Be Everything” encourages non-binary, trans and cis-gendered girls to bravely and boldly be themselves.

“Poetry is having a moment right now, and I hope it’s not just a moment. We turn to poetry in times of emotional need, and in times of collective crisis.”

Five Women Poets on Writing the Body

With a sublime mastery of language and artistry, five women poets— Rachel Eliza Griffiths, Patricia Smith, Ellen Bass, Toi Derricotte, Tina Chang—ask us to consider bodies facing attacks both physical and psychological. They write in defense, in awe and awareness of the body, pointing again and again to our shared humanity.

Poetry for the Moment: Healing, Resistance and Possibility

As protests against police violence have bloomed across the country, many have turned to sharing art, and poetry in particular, as a source of comfort and inspiration. In a time when the news can be a source of pain and violence, poetry can be a source of healing and joy. Here are some poems that deal with relevant themes during this revolutionary moment: healing, resistance and possibility.

Sappho’s Series of Lesbian Poets: t’ai freedom ford’s Black-Ass Sonnets

Mary Meriam—founding editor of Headmistress Press, one of the few presses in the United States specializing in lesbian poetry— interviews t’ai freedom ford about her fantastic new collection, “& more black.”

“As a Black, queer, masculine presenting woman, my writing is informed by these identities and how someone like me negotiates the mainstream/dominant American culture that consistently seeks to marginalize my voice and the voices of those who look, act and love like me.”