Keeping Score: “A Cabinet That Looks Like America”

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: Meghan Markle opens up about her miscarriage; the pope critiques the U.S. Supreme Court’s pandemic response; Biden announces Cabinet appointees; Janet Yellen is nominated as first woman Treasury Secretary; Scotland passes the Period Products Bill; Rep. Katherine Clark elected assistant speaker of the House; trans woman and former sex worker Elisa Crespo runs for NYC Council; and more.

Race-Conscious Policies—Including Affirmative Action—Are Necessary For Addressing Racial Inequity

Affirmative action recently survived yet another legal attack when the First Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in Harvard’s favor in a case challenging affirmative action.

This latest case against Harvard demonstrates that color-blindness cannot uproot this country’s legacy of racism. We must face race head-on to meaningfully address the racial inequality that persists in our society.

Asian Americans in the 2020 Election: Our Survival is Political

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic and a national reckoning with racism, Sarah Min argues, “Now is the time for Asian Americans to come together to fight for racial, economic and social justice.”

In Min’s home state of Pennsylvania, there are over 230,000 Asian Americans in Pennsylvania who are eligible to vote but have not registered. Therefore, she is calling on Asian Americans to “become more civically engaged for the liberation of all people.”

Not Proud, Boys

All of us who recognize manhood and masculinity are evolving must speak out about the intimidating alpha males who pose a grave threat to society, especially at this fraught moment when COVID-19 is ravaging the world.

Accommodating Pregnant Workers is a Matter of Reproductive, Economic and Racial Justice

It’s still the case that too many women of color are fired or
forced out when they request a modest workplace accommodation to protect their health. Longer term, pregnancy discrimination pushes women deeper into poverty, jeopardizing the health and economic well-being of our families.

Last month, the House passed the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act with overwhelming bipartisan support. Now, we must call on the Senate to take up this bill without delay.