Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation: The Case for Canceling Party Primaries; Remembering Jeannette Rankin, the First Woman Elected to Congress

Weekend Reading for Women’s Representation is a compilation of stories about women’s representation.

This week: Remembering Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to U.S. Congress; how can the Republican Party recruit more women candidates?; election highlights for women, including the women elected to the NYC Council; the case for canceling party primaries; and more.

‘The Suffrage Road Trip’: A Tribute to Two Middle-Aged, Lesbian, Immigrant Suffragists

In “We Demand: The Suffrage Road Trip”, middle-aged lesbian Swedish immigrants Ingeborg Kindstedt and Maria Kindberg advocate for women’s suffrage in 1915.

I fell in love with Ingeborg and Maria when I retraced their route in 2015, and was astonished to find they’d gotten so little recognition for all they did—likely because they were older, working class women who spoke accented English.

Today in Feminist History: Suffragists Flock to National Women’s Rights Convention (September 8, 1852)

The convention will continue two more days, and the struggle will go on for as long as may be necessary. But if future advocates of equality for women have the same dedication as those present today, there is no doubt that Elizabeth Oakes Smith’s prediction of victory will prove true, and those who can say they were among the first to begin the work of winning total equality for women will be especially honored.

Alice Paul Aspired for Gender Equality by 2023: “Women Will Have the Opportunity to Revolutionize the World”

Ninety-nine years ago, ERA author Alice Paul opined in the local Washington newspaper that women’s equality would easily be won by 2023. It’s painful that her prediction is so wrong—but last month’s vote in the House of Representatives to remove the deadline for passage of the Equal Rights Amendment means American women are closer to constitutional equality than ever before.