War on Women Report No. 23

This week, reports broke detailing the Trump administration’s back-room attempts to make the U.S. a “pro-life nation” and the tie between Trump’s rhetoric and increasing acts of extremist violence. The Trump administration also continued to propogate dangerous stereotypes about immigrants and pushed legislation hurting women and families.

This Week in Women: It’s Long Past Time We Took Gender-Based Crimes More Seriously

An Islamist in Mali is being tried by the International Criminal Court in a “groundbreaking case” for forcing hundreds of women into sexual slavery. Meanwhile, Trump is going the other direction.

Reproductive Justice is Climate Justice: Why I’m Celebrating My IUD This Earth Day

Three years ago, on Earth Day, I became the proud owner of an IUD. The decision wasn’t just a great choice for my own health—it was also a great way to improve my carbon footprint.

French Feminism from the Intersections

Unfazed by opposition and motivated by a truer sense of France’s ternary motto, Rokhaya Diallo is an envoy of black excellence recognized internationally for confronting the heteropatricarchy in tireless combat.

Comedy is Part of Feminist History—and We Need it Now More Than Ever

There is no fiercer political weapon than laughter. Feminists have known that all along.

How Can We Be Heard If We Are Arrested?

Nations will fail to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals if the warnings of feminist activists are ignored. Unfortunately, many gender equality advocates around the world are being persecuted every day by their governments.

The Lesbian Poets of Headmistress Press: Jessica K. Hylton and Jen Rouse in Conversation

Two lesbian poets talk about journeys, being seen and fusing the biographic with the fantastic.

Parkland’s Menstrual Equity Moment

In an unexpected way, a much-mocked solution at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in the wake of a school shooting sparked a conversation around menstrual stigma—redefining the terms of “conceal and carry.”

Five Feminist Poems for National Poetry Month: “The Quiet Woman” by Genevieve Taggard

Women have been responding to sexual harassment for generations. Poet Genevieve Taggard, born in 1894 in Washington state, was one of them; in “The Quiet Woman,” she captures fury and anger “like a surly tiger” of a woman fending off an unwanted advance.

Women in Italy are Demanding a #MeToo Moment

Women took to the streets in 40 cities all over Italy last month with a clear warning for the patriarchy.

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