Latinas Must Work 22 Months To Earn What White Men Earned in Just 12

latina equal pay day
(WOCinTech Chat / Flickr)

Thursday, October 29 is Latina Equal Pay Day—the approximate day in 2020 when the average Latina finally catches up to what the average white, non-Hispanic man earned in just 2019 alone.

Throughout the year, the feminist community marks a variety of Equal Pay Days: Asian American Women’s Equal Pay Day in February, all women’s Equal Pay Day in March, Black Women’s Equal Pay Day in August, and Native American Women’s Equal Pay Day in September. But Latina Equal Pay Day comes dead last.

Because Latinas are paid only 55 cents on average for every dollar paid to white non-Hispanic men, this means Latinas must work a total of 22 months to earn what white men earned in just 12.

Over a Latina’s 40-year career, this amounts to over one million dollars of lost income. The wage gap experienced by Latina workers persists across occupations, and exists at every level of education between Latinas and white, non-Hispanic men.

It is one thing to experience gender discrimination, and another to experience racial discrimination. For women of color, who sit at the intersection of race and gender discrimination, the impact felt is magnified—and this is no different for Latinas. 

Take Action

Use hashtags #LatinaEqualPay to uplift #Trabajadoras at work, at home and at the ballot box.

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Equal Rights Advocates is an American non-profit women’s rights organization that was founded in 1974. ERA is a legal organization dedicated to advancing rights and opportunities for women, girls, and people of all gender identities through groundbreaking legal cases.