Keeping Score: Olympics Ban Swim Caps Made for Black Hair; Abortion Restrictions Reach Record High in 2021; Biden Administration Boasts Narrowest Pay Gap in History

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: abortion restrictions skyrocket in 2021; Olympic policies disproportionately target Black women; Supreme Court rules in favor of free speech and gender expression; state legislatures endanger voting rights; and more.

Abortion Restrictions Cost Women, Businesses and States $105 Billion Each Year

Businesses over the years have spoken out on gay marriage, bathroom bills, and most recently on voter suppression, but there is dead silence on abortion rights. This is especially noteworthy, given state-level abortion restrictions cost the U.S. economy $105 billion per year by reducing women’s labor force participation and earnings and increasing turnover and time off from work among women ages 15 to 44 years. Without abortion restrictions, the national GDP would be nearly half a percent greater.

Fighting for Pay Equity: A Q&A with Lilly Ledbetter and the Filmmaker Telling Her Story

When Lilly Ledbetter, a longtime manager at Goodyear, discovered her salary was significantly lower than her male colleagues, she took the company to court. While her case was overturned at the Supreme Court, her hard work finally paying off when President Barack Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 into law as his first official act.

Now, Lilly’s life and her case are going to be the subject of “Lilly,” a feature film, directed by Rachel Feldman and starring Patricia Clarkson. Ms interviewed Ledbetter and Feldman about their exciting project.

Money Talks: It is Time to Pay for Parity

Financial sanctions and incentives to enforce gender quotas have been gaining popularity both in politics and business over the last decade.

But in the U.S., despite decades of demanding a seat at the table, women make up less than 30 percent of all elected officials. Political parties and our government have a role to play in improving women’s political representation up and down the ballot; and, it is time they start using their money to make it happen.