In Defense of the “1619 Project”

The “1619 Project” is critical in bringing the U.S. up to par in taking responsibility for slavery, and, perhaps even more so, in taking action to repairing the educational standard around slaver and all the ways its influence continues to permeate the United States.

It is no wonder white historians and senators alike feel threatened; Sen. Tom Cotton’s feet are firmly planted in the faith of American exceptionalism, so to him and those who share his beliefs, a curriculum that reveals a not-so-exceptional U.S. is earth-shattering.

Oshun Energy in Beyoncé’s “Black is King”

We are certainly entering a new era when Beyoncé, our most celebrated Black pop star, can access a dominant worldwide corporation like Disney—responsible for some of the most troubling anti-Black representations for nearly a century—and utilize its platform to correct our image and offer us a grand, divine mirror to see ourselves anew. “Black is King” is Oshun’s mirror by way of Beyoncé’s artistic vision.

Pearl Ricks: Race and Privilege are Major Gatekeepers to Abortion Care

The recent June Medical Services vs. Russo decision safeguarded the right to abortion access for vulnerable communities in Louisiana—but it was a small victory in the larger battle for abortion rights and access. Ms. talked to Pearl Ricks, Executive Director of the Reproductive Justice Action Collective, about the June Medical decision and the gatekeeping of abortion in the U.S.—and who it affects most.

“People in the South want to be able to access abortions—whether they ever get one in their lives or not. But who are the louder voices? Who are the ones most adamantly going out and voting?”

The Lost Season: COVID-19’s Impact on Underrepresented Playwrights

Donnetta Grays is just one of many playwrights whose productions were cut short this year due to COVID-19—since the spring season is generally when theaters “take more risks” in producing shows outside of the traditional canon. So the pandemic, unsurprisingly, is disproportionately affecting playwrights who produce such “radical” work—namely, Black, queer and marginalized writers.

The Kilroys’ LIST aims to memorialize those productions.