Despite a History-Making Oscars, Women’s Underrepresentation Behind the Camera Persists

Despite women making history in the top categories at the Oscars, the number of female nominees in the 18 non-acting categories increased by only two percentage points this year, according to a Women’s Media Center analysis.

“Media frames our democratic debate, interprets and amplifies our policies and our politics. Media tells us who has power and who matters.”

Cold Cases, Misogyny and Race in America: Q&A with Jillian Lauren, Host of Docuseries ‘Confronting a Serial Killer’ on STARZ

In the haunting new docuseries ‘Confronting a Serial Killer,’ Jillian Lauren chronicles conversations with Sam Little in which he confessed to strangling 93 women over four decades across the country. That’s more murders than Ted Bundy, John Wayne Gacy and Jeffrey Dahmer combined. How did he get away with it?

The Crime Hidden in Plain Sight: An Interview with Amy Ziering, Director of ‘Allen v. Farrow’

We’ve grown accustomed to the premise underpinning the HBOMax series ‘Allen v. Farrow,’ directed by Amy Ziering and Kirby Dick. Yet another heralded male celebrity, this time Woody Allen, is exposed by accusations of sexual assault. Yet, what’s most disturbing about the details uncovered by the investigative work in ‘Allen v. Farrow’ is just how much hid in plain sight—for nearly 30 years.

“Madan Sara” Tells the Story of Haitian Women Both Ordinary and Extraordinary

“Madan Sara” centers Haitian women’s voices, perspectives and even policy recommendations to imagine a future in which Haitian businesswomen no longer operate on the margins.

“To talk about Madan Sara is to talk about Haitian women”—but it is also to talk about pressing issues like structural violence, government failures and resistance to neoliberalism that resonate throughout the Global South.

Sundance 2021: “CODA” and “Marvelous and the Black Hole” Are Stand-Out Coming-of-Age Features

“CODA” marks an important step in the right direction for diversity and inclusion in film: a crowd-pleaser that faithfully and respectfully represents a marginalized community often lacking in representation.

“Marvelous and the Black Hole” manages to be both playful and meditative by turns, navigating Sammy’s deep and real grief while recognizing that sometimes the ways teenagers express themselves is simultaneously unproductive and wholly outside their control.