Keeping Score: California Schools to Provide Free Period Products; Title X Gag Rule Reversed; Texas Abortion Ban Reinstated

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: Biden administration reverses Title X gag rule; federal courts halt, then reinstate Texas’s six-week abortion ban; school districts crack down on BLM and pride flags; Playboy features first gay man on its cover; California overrides workplace NDAs *and* requires free menstrual products in schools; and more.

As a Woman Researcher, I Experienced the Harassment and Silencing of the Women Soldiers I Interviewed

Women peacekeepers are being asked to increase the security for women civilians in conflict zones—yet women peacekeepers are being sexually harassed and assaulted by men in their own militaries. How can the U.N. Security Council stand by its call to troop contributing countries to increase the numbers of women peacekeepers they are deploying, when they can’t keep them safe?

Us Too: Cuomo’s Departure Highlights Need for Coercive Control Laws in U.S.

Andrew Cuomo went out swinging on his last day in office—insisting he’s being railroaded even as the moving vans rolled out.

I honestly don’t care about his claims. What I do care about is whether the outgoing New York governor’s sexual harassment scandal will prompt more states to finally enact laws against coercive control—a form of domestic bullying that can cause psychological trauma.

Feminist Mobility Solutions Can Drive a More Just Transportation System

A new Women’s Environment and Development Organization report makes the case that by realizing the potential for intentional and equitable investment that prioritizes universal access and affordability for all, takes into account the differentiated needs of users it has historically marginalized and learns lessons from feminist transportation advocates, U.S. mobility infrastructure can actually serve as a critical pathway to achieving racial, economic and gender justice. 

What is the Legacy of the “Gender-Equal” Tokyo 2020 Games?

When the IOC announced last winter that Tokyo 2020 would be “the first gender-equal Olympic Games,” they were touting the near 50% representation of female athletes, an all-time high.

Now that the summer games have concluded, the IOC statement turned out to be prescient in other unexpected ways: fierce feminism has been on full display for the past two weeks as athletes boldly broke norms and pushed back against sexist protocols and practices.

Keeping Score: Paralympic Medalists Achieve Equal Pay; U.S. Women’s Soccer Gets Support From Men’s Team in Equal Pay Lawsuit; Bipartisan Jan. 6 Investigation Begins

In every issue of Ms., we track research on our progress in the fight for equality, catalogue can’t-miss quotes from feminist voices and keep tabs on the feminist movement’s many milestones. We’re Keeping Score online, too—in in this biweekly round-up.

This week: top U.S. athletes advocate for gender equality and mental health support; Paralympic athletes receive equal compensation for first time in history; U.S. drug distributors could owe $26 billion for their role in the opioid epidemic; Democrats push for women’s inclusion in the military draft; Argentina becomes first Latin American country to issue gender neutral IDs; and more.

Youth of Color Take Action in Preventing Sexual Harassment in Bay Area

In order to make Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) safer for females and gender-expansive people, Reminie Chaidez and 99 other paid youth joined forces with Alliance for Girls to launch a campaign against gender-based violence in the country’s fifth largest transit system.

“Youth are the legacy of public transportation. We want other people to take this as an example and ask their local transit agencies to do the same.”