Rabbi Hara Person: Why Progressive Faith Leaders Must Defend Reproductive Rights

Ms. recently spoke with Rabbi Hara Person—chief executive of the Central Conference of American Rabbis and self-proclaimed “reader, writer, feminist and challah-baker” —about politics, women’s rights, and the role of faith-based leaders in 2020.

“We need to make sure people hear that there is no such thing as the one religious perspective or the one faith perspective on reproductive rights—we need to say loudly and clearly that there is a progressive religious voice on these issues as well as the right wing religious voice that they regularly hear. “

Civil Rights Hero JoAnne Bland: “This Time, We’re Going to Go All the Way”

JoAnne Bland, founder of Journeys for the Soul tour company, was 11 years old when she crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965—a day that would come to be known as Bloody Sunday.

“To look at those kids out there trying to do what’s right and saying they’re not gonna take it anymore, brought back the memories of the ‘60s. And when police attacked, it really took me straight back to that bridge, straight back to that bridge. How could this happen? To still be happening 55 years later, how can it? … But [I pray that] those children don’t stop. Don’t stop ‘til they get it right. … I encourage them and I pray every day: Please don’t stop. Change will come if you keep their feet to the fire. Change will come.”

Pearl Ricks: Race and Privilege are Major Gatekeepers to Abortion Care

The recent June Medical Services vs. Russo decision safeguarded the right to abortion access for vulnerable communities in Louisiana—but it was a small victory in the larger battle for abortion rights and access. Ms. talked to Pearl Ricks, Executive Director of the Reproductive Justice Action Collective, about the June Medical decision and the gatekeeping of abortion in the U.S.—and who it affects most.

“People in the South want to be able to access abortions—whether they ever get one in their lives or not. But who are the louder voices? Who are the ones most adamantly going out and voting?”

Musician Margaret Glaspy is Exploring “Devotion” in Quarantine

When singer-songwriter Margaret Glaspy imagined the release of “Devotion,” her sophomore record, it didn’t include a world-wide quarantine.

“Devotion” is a mark of her commitment to process through electronic pop, a sonic shift away from her highly praised folk debut. With lyrics that delve into gray areas of love, art and political engagement, Glaspy holds up multidimensionality in earnest. She hopes to reach the others who could use a lift, and articulates how the act of creating anchors her, even now.

Celebrating the Suffrage Centennial with “The Vote” Producer Michelle Ferrari

Producer Michelle Ferrari sits down with Ms. for a conversation surrounding her new documentary exploring the 72-year battle that eventually led to the passage of the 19th Amendment. The two-part documentary explains the long-fought and surprisingly unfamiliar story of women’s struggle to secure the right to vote. The film comes at a crucial moment, commemorating the centennial of the women’s vote— focusing on divisions in the movement, injustices, obstacles and achievements.

Q&A: Oakland Architect Deanna Van Buren Is Building a World Without Prisons

Deanna Van Buren is co-founder, executive director and design director of Designing Justice + Designing Spaces, an Oakland-based architecture and real estate development nonprofit working to end mass incarceration by building infrastructure that redefines the entire criminal justice pipeline.

“There’s an entire infrastructure for criminal justice; we could create an entire infrastructure for restorative justice.”