The Ms. Top Feminists of 2020

Despite the political, economic and public health challenges this year—or perhaps because of them—feminists mobilized, fought for our rights, and made progress on many of the issues we care deeply about.

From voter mobilization to reproductive justice, politicians to pop stars, here are our top feminists of 2020.

“Invisible Women”: Excluding 50 Percent of the World’s Population Has Real Consequences

For too long, women have been invisible in world affairs, and this invisibility of approximately 50 percent of the world’s population has real consequences. It leads to incomplete and inaccurate pictures of reality, which in turn leads to poorly planned policies, or perhaps a lack of policies in issue areas that need them.

Ultimately, the invisibility of women in world affairs leads to unnecessary pain and suffering, for women and men alike.

The Ms. Q&A: Actor-Activist Vanessa Marano on Shifting the Trafficking Narrative to Survivors

Conversations around sex trafficking experienced a resurgence following the investigation and indictment of billionaire Jeffrey Epstein and his accomplice Ghislaine Maxwell. However, the renewed spotlight on sex trafficking also helped popularize a plethora of unsupported conspiracy theories—leaving survivors in the shadows as powerful people continue to contort the narrative.

Media Invited Primarily White, Male Guests to Discuss Ginsburg’s Death and Supreme Court’s Future

From September 18, the day Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died, through September 29, weekday cable news hosted overwhelmingly white and primarily male guests to discuss her legacy and President Donald Trump’s September 26 nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. 76% of the guests on weekday cable news were white and 62% were men.

Conventional Ignorance: Belva Davis Confronts Violent Racism at the 1964 RNC

At the very outset of what would become an award-winning career as a TV journalist, Belva Davis confronted violent racism at the 1964 Republican National Convention, at which conservative Arizona senator Barry Goldwater was nominated for the presidency. Her memory of that daunting experience reminds us that we’ve been through change followed by backlash before.

“Day one of the convention had been tense but orderly. … Day two was starting to spin out of control.”