Meet the Feminist Artists Recreating the Iconic First Ms. Cover—Five Decades Later

In 1972, Miriam Wosk created the iconic first cover of Ms. magazine. Fifty years later, the Spring cover of Ms. pays homage to Wosk’s work.

The idea for the cover recreation was conceived by Ms. art director Brandi Phipps, who commissioned the project to D.C.-based artist Ashley Jaye Williams. Ms. digital editor Roxy Szal spoke to Phipps and Williams to see what it was like to pick up Wosk’s baton five decades later, their hopes for the cover’s impact on viewers, favorite Ms. covers over the years, and more.

The Ms. Q&A With Ani DiFranco: “You Have License To Be All the Aspects of Yourself and To Be Unashamed of Them”

Ms. spoke with DiFranco in the lead up to her April 18 livestream concert, celebrating the release of her new album Revolutionary Love. She spoke with us about poetry, feminism, domestic abuse, shame, allyship and places where vulnerability and strength can co-exist. She was calling in from New Orleans, with her children and dog moving through the background and her head newly shaved. Ms. spoke with DiFranco in the lead up to her April 18 livestream concert, celebrating the release of her new album Revolutionary Love. She spoke with us about poetry, feminism, domestic abuse, shame, allyship and places where vulnerability and strength can co-exist. She was calling in from New Orleans, with her children and dog moving through the background and her head newly shaved. At age 50, she could still feel traces of her younger self and “the epic journey” that led her there.

Dismantling the Patriarchy in Technicolor

“I opened Girls Garage as a physical space where all girls, especially girls of color, would feel safe and inspired to exercise their personal voice and power. The fact that a space like this exists is in and of itself, a political statement, and the creativity that comes out of it naturally represents our hope, anger and identities.”

Fashion and Feminism Converge in a New Exhibit at the Peabody Essex Museum

“Made It: The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion,” a new exhibition at the Peabody Essex Museum in Massachusetts, explores 250 years of fashion through 79 female designers—innovators, entrepreneurs and activists who fostered social and political change as women won more equity and freedom in the world.

The exhibit open in-person Nov. 21, 2020, with virtual events for remote visitors.